You don’t have to be a rock climber or a mountaineer to appreciate the outer limits of human ability and endurance to which these athletes often push themselves. For the past five years Colorado College graduate Pete Mortimer (’97) has been helping to curate Reel Rock, a mini touring film festival (see trailer above) that features most daring and innovative climbers and mountaineers from around the world. This year’s festival includes films about a free climber who uses a base parachute instead of ropes to ascend some of the most spectacular climbs in the world by himself; a speed-climber and alpinist who climbs the Eiger in under 3 hours (see clip below); and two young men from Boulder who complete the most technically difficult bouldering routes in the world (listen to interview about the film below).

The festival runs around two hours with an intermission tonight at Armstrong Hall on the Colorado College Campus. A complete list and description of the films can be found HERE. Ticket information can be found HERE.

We interviewed Pete Mortimer about the festival and the recent history of climbing that his festival has been documenting.

Pete Mortimer Reel Rock Interview

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

He also talks about “The Hardest Moves” about the two young boulderers, which he helped film.

Pete Mortimer Discusses “The Hardest Moves”

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

Comments are closed.

News

AFP/Getty Images
May 28, 2016 | NPR · The case focused on a plan known as Operation Condor. This marks the first time a court has ruled that it was a criminal conspiracy to track down and disappear political dissidents across borders.
 

AFP/Getty Images
May 28, 2016 | NPR · He’s beginning to expand his political network by helping upstart progressive congressional candidates and state legislators, lending his fundraising prowess and national fame to boost their bids.
 

May 28, 2016 | NPR · NPR’s Scott Simon talks with writer Russell Banks about his new book, “Voyager.” It’s a collection of travel writing that also reads like a memoir.
 

Arts & Life

Getty Images
May 28, 2016 | NPR · This week we’ve invited Craig Fugate, administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, to the show. (So if a giant asteroid crashes into Earth while he plays our quiz, you’re on your own.)
 

May 28, 2016 | NPR · NPR’s Scott Simon talks with writer Russell Banks about his new book, “Voyager.” It’s a collection of travel writing that also reads like a memoir.
 

May 28, 2016 | NPR · Stephanie Danler’s new novel follows a young woman finding herself in the New York City restaurant world. It’s voluptuous, ripeness on the verge of rot — but anything more tasteful wouldn’t do.
 

Music

May 28, 2016 | NPR · William Bell cut his first Stax records tracks more than 50 years ago. Now, he’s back on the label. Bell tells NPR’s Scott Simon about his new album, and remixing one of his biggest hits.
 

Courtesy of the artist
May 28, 2016 | NPR · The young band recently released a single called “Michigan And Again.” Though the band’s three members do love their home state, the inspiration for the song came from an unlikely source.
 

AFP/Getty Images
May 28, 2016 | NPR · Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab