You don’t have to be a rock climber or a mountaineer to appreciate the outer limits of human ability and endurance to which these athletes often push themselves. For the past five years Colorado College graduate Pete Mortimer (’97) has been helping to curate Reel Rock, a mini touring film festival (see trailer above) that features most daring and innovative climbers and mountaineers from around the world. This year’s festival includes films about a free climber who uses a base parachute instead of ropes to ascend some of the most spectacular climbs in the world by himself; a speed-climber and alpinist who climbs the Eiger in under 3 hours (see clip below); and two young men from Boulder who complete the most technically difficult bouldering routes in the world (listen to interview about the film below).

The festival runs around two hours with an intermission tonight at Armstrong Hall on the Colorado College Campus. A complete list and description of the films can be found HERE. Ticket information can be found HERE.

We interviewed Pete Mortimer about the festival and the recent history of climbing that his festival has been documenting.

Pete Mortimer Reel Rock Interview

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He also talks about “The Hardest Moves” about the two young boulderers, which he helped film.

Pete Mortimer Discusses “The Hardest Moves”

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