This fall Colorado voters will decide on a trio of measures that would cut taxes and fees and ban the state from borrowing money. And while the initiatives are being debated as a group, each one separately would have a host of different implications. State capitol reporter Bente Birkeland is breaking down each of the amendments for us, starting with Amendment 60.

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One Response to Amendment 60 Overview

  1. Mary Heimerman says:

    And where do they thing the “state” gets the money to run anything? The base purpose of this bill would stop everything except education for a year, and then it would all have to be refunded again. Our local taxes might go down, but probably now, and our state taxes would have to go back up – past current levels to fun the additional billions. STUPID.
    Once again someone has tacked all kinds of junk together to “make government behave” like we didn’t all vote on the measures. Like it’s a big baby that needs spanked.

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