Yesterday, in the first part of our journey down the Lower Arkansas River from Pueblo to Avondale, yesterday, we found our way onto the river, wobbled around a bit and discovered the joys of this seldom-traveled, slow-water canoe trip. In the second part, here, we see a lot of weird things and piles of concrete, some handsome wildlife, and a lot more river-beaten trash. Then we take an unplanned dip in the river and…

See the exciting conclusion of our two part series.

Also, check out this video essay of our journey.


14 Responses to Pueblo to Avondale by Canoe, Part 2

  1. Joyce Cheney says:

    Hilarious treatment of your tip-over – thanks!
    In terms of tubing down and therefore, soaking in the water for 5 hrs., how polluted is the water?

  2. Mary Jean Wamble says:

    Did seeing the piles of concrete on the riverbank make you want to further investigate why they’re there? I hope you do, and then let us know!

  3. Wow, hope your camera gear was okay after the tipping! This story is so wonderful, hope you do another travel adventure again soon. Is the farm open to the public?

  4. Rose Enyeart says:

    I loved your trip. What a hoot to see the sunken ship and others. I laughed out loud. Thanks. It was fun!!

  5. Noel Black says:

    Joyce, the level of pollution (and what pollutant might be present) probably varies greatly depending on water levels and the amount of rain. I’ve heard of people tubing this same section, but can’t attest.

    We’ll call the Army Corps of Enginneers and see what we can find out about that and the concrete on the banks and get back to you.

    No comment on the camera gear.

    Hobbs Family Farm is not “public,” but you could probably call down there and make an appointment.

  6. Mary Ellen says:

    What a wonderful adventure–I’m jealous.
    Tamarisk is invading the Arkansas and other Colorado rivers. Here’s a website WITH MAPS of where you were:

  7. I was so looking forward to my lunch hour and your further adventures. Loved the sinking ship and part about tipping. I have an Old Towne canoe that I can’t heave any longer. Would be happy to sell it to any Arkansas River enthusiasts. But as you pointed out, my canoe is better suited for a lake. Hey, you could buy it and then film cruising along the shore line of some of our bigger lakes.

  8. anne lennox says:

    So why is there no photo of the “quickmud” aftermath? An obvious photo op!!!

  9. Craig says:


    There absolutely should have been a photo of the quickmud moment, but alas, we were both so overcome by the moment, what with trying to make sure that Noel didn’t succumb to the gooey earth and perish, that the thought of snapping some shots of the action never quite reached the orbit of our mindfulness. And perhaps it’s best, as imagining such a thing is almost always more enjoyable than the reality of it. I mean, the moment was imbued with such patheticity that had it been recorded it would only have served as an agent of ridicule to Noel’s already delicate, though volatile, sense of personhoodedness.

  10. Joyce says:

    You make “taking a canoe trip” very enticing with your discovery of wildlife and beautifully detailed pictures of frogs. After the cement and refuse in the river it was refreshing to end with the organic farm with fresh vegetables and the darling little girl with her kitten.

  11. Daisy says:

    Great story! I loved part I & II, epic storytelling and pictures. What a treat to see Jamie and Avery on the farm, they sure look happy.
    I also lament the lack of quickmud photos, but I’m sure Craig was busy throwing him a rope and heaving him up out of the mud. I learned that technique from the Worst Case Scenario Survival game, fyi.

  12. Jeremy Van Hoy says:

    What? No ‘Dueling Banjos’ to listen to?? Very disappointing…

  13. […] CommentsJeremy Van Hoy on Pueblo to Avondale by Canoe, Part 2Sarah Milteer on KRCC Makes John Hazlehurst BetterDelaney Utterback on KRCC Makes John Hazlehurst […]


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