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This coming Sunday’s episode of Western Skies is all about agriculture. To be honest, every episode of Western Skies probably could be about agriculture and the myriad stories about the pleasures and perils of how we grow and consume our food. One of the many potential features that didn’t make it into this Sunday’s show is local writer Sandra Knauf’s excellent and entertaining self-published magazine Greenwoman Zine (six issues and counting) about her adventures as an amateur gardener and urban farmer. Full of diaries, cartoons, essays, articles and poems by herself and others about everything from gender bending chickens to a primer on garlic, it’s Knauf’s wide-eyed, often self-deprecating struggles with the earth and its bounty (or not) over the past decade that make her zine approachable and highly relatable. On top of that, there’s a lot of practical gardening and urban farming wisdom to be gleaned.

Knauf’s website is HERE, and you can order actual copies of these lovingly produced, hand-bound magazines at her Etsy site HERE.

 

5 Responses to Zine Garden

  1. D'Arcy Fallon says:

    Wow!!!! Congratulations. As a fervent reader of Greenwoman, I’m glad to see Sandy getting her due!

  2. Denise Washington says:

    Thanks for reviewing Sandy’s awesome zine. Glad that she is getting her props!

  3. We have a full run of Greenwoman in the Colorado College Zine Collection at Tutt Library Special Collections (1021 N. Cascade). Come on over and see them! A full list of our zines is here: http://www.coloradocollege.edu/library/SpecialCollections/zines/

  4. Mary Ellen says:

    I’m so glad that Greenwoman is at Tutt Library–its delightful reading! –Mary Ellen

  5. kathryn says:

    I love Sandra Knauf’s Greenwoman. It’s original and entertaining, and above all, a visual delight.

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