_____________________________________________________

This coming Sunday’s episode of Western Skies is all about agriculture. To be honest, every episode of Western Skies probably could be about agriculture and the myriad stories about the pleasures and perils of how we grow and consume our food. One of the many potential features that didn’t make it into this Sunday’s show is local writer Sandra Knauf’s excellent and entertaining self-published magazine Greenwoman Zine (six issues and counting) about her adventures as an amateur gardener and urban farmer. Full of diaries, cartoons, essays, articles and poems by herself and others about everything from gender bending chickens to a primer on garlic, it’s Knauf’s wide-eyed, often self-deprecating struggles with the earth and its bounty (or not) over the past decade that make her zine approachable and highly relatable. On top of that, there’s a lot of practical gardening and urban farming wisdom to be gleaned.

Knauf’s website is HERE, and you can order actual copies of these lovingly produced, hand-bound magazines at her Etsy site HERE.

 

5 Responses to Zine Garden

  1. D'Arcy Fallon says:

    Wow!!!! Congratulations. As a fervent reader of Greenwoman, I’m glad to see Sandy getting her due!

  2. Denise Washington says:

    Thanks for reviewing Sandy’s awesome zine. Glad that she is getting her props!

  3. We have a full run of Greenwoman in the Colorado College Zine Collection at Tutt Library Special Collections (1021 N. Cascade). Come on over and see them! A full list of our zines is here: http://www.coloradocollege.edu/library/SpecialCollections/zines/

  4. Mary Ellen says:

    I’m so glad that Greenwoman is at Tutt Library–its delightful reading! –Mary Ellen

  5. kathryn says:

    I love Sandra Knauf’s Greenwoman. It’s original and entertaining, and above all, a visual delight.

News

Getty Images
February 21, 2017 | NPR · American drivers put 3.22 trillion miles on the nations roads last year, up by 2.8 percent from 2015. A better economy and lower gas prices fueled the increase, which highlights infrastructure needs.
 

AFP/Getty Images
February 21, 2017 | NPR · The Supreme Court heard arguments in a “very sympathetic case” involving the shooting of an unarmed Mexican teen on the border. The justices will decide if the boy’s family may sue the border agent.
 

AP
February 21, 2017 | NPR · The researchers found that ISIS took in approximately 50 percent less income last year than in 2014. That’s because its financial fortunes are linked to the amount of territory it controls.
 

Arts & Life

Atsushi Nishijima/ Fox Searchlight
February 21, 2017 | NPR · A study of the 25 films nominated for Best Picture Oscars over the past three years found less than 12 percent of the characters were people over the age of 60.
 

February 21, 2017 | NPR · Yuval Noah Harari expects we’ll soon engineer our bodies in the same way we design products. “I think in general medicine … will switch from healing the sick to upgrading the healthy,” he says.
 

Getty Images
February 21, 2017 | NPR · An ad in a March 1852 edition of The New York Times led Zachary Turpin on an electronic search that uncovered a rags-to-riches novella that Whitman published anonymously.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
February 21, 2017 | NPR · As a budding rock singer in the ’90s, Hart battled crippling addiction. Today, she’s healthy — and shares how artists can survive in an industry that can be dismissive of mental illness.
 

Courtesy of the Minnesota Orchestra
February 21, 2017 | NPR · The conductor who worked with the Minneapolis symphony for more than 50 years — and brought them to national prominence — died Tuesday at age 93.
 

Courtesy of the artists
February 21, 2017 | NPR · A bonkers new song from Shugo Tokumaru helps wash away an unwelcome earworm, Lana Del Rey lauds (her?) youth, Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy weirds out over love and Bob revisits an old favorite.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab