Pueblo’s Arkansas Levee mural is a great example of how something widely perceived as negative (graffiti, in this case) can be turned into a cultural opportunity. Once a long and large slab of concrete designed to channel runoff of the Arkansas River from the Pueblo Reservoir, the Levee became a natural site for graffiti artists, many of them rather clever students back in the 1980s. While the city could have fought it, covering it with abstract blobs of leftover paint, they embraced it, let a group organize it and, at 3-miles long and growing, allowed it to turn into the world’s longest continuous painting (according to the Guiness Book of World Records).

Please enjoy this slideshow which is NOT completely comprehensive, unfortunately (hey, it was 104 degrees out there), but covers most of the 3-miles beginning at the west end and heads East, including the south side of the Levee at the east end, which is mostly devoted to murals by children. We also recommend clicking the four arrows in the lower-right-hand corner of the slideshow to watch it in full-screen mode for the greatest appreciation of its details.

For more information on the mural project, you can go HERE.

 

4 Responses to The Incredible Pueblo Levee Mural Art

  1. Pueblo Resident says:

    It may well be a cultural opportunity… to residents. But motorists driving by on I-25 don’t realize this and it ends up looking just like what it is, graffiti. In my opinion it, the rusting out hulks on steel mill property and the junk/scrap yard (both visible from the interstate), make Pueblo look like a run down cesspool. It’s not flattering and casts the wrong impression; that we don’t care about graffiti.

    Yes, it’s nice if you know the story… but if you don’t, it’s an eyesore.

  2. Laura Donavan says:

    Thanks for the photo essay. I really enjoyed it.

  3. COS resident says:

    Hey Pueblo, I used to clown on you a lot, but now I think you are pretty awesome, graffiti and scrapyards and all.

  4. 'Letta says:

    What an awesome slide show. The graffiti displayed took a lot of man hours and skill to be able to create art on the side of a sloping wall with a river below you. It takes talent to be able to create on such a large scale up close.

News

AFP/Getty Images
September 3, 2014 | NPR · The reinforcements, announced late Tuesday, raise the number of U.S. forces in the country to more than 1,000.
 

ROSCOSMOS
September 2, 2014 | NPR · A returned space capsule was opened to reveal frozen gecko remains inside, disappointing scientists. On the bright side, the fruit flies that were aboard made it.
 

September 2, 2014 | NPR · To learn more about the recent celebrity photo hack, Melissa Block speaks with Matthew Green of Johns Hopkins University. They discuss how the photos might have been obtained.
 

Arts & Life

iStockphoto
September 2, 2014 | NPR · For iPad users who are nostalgic for the clickety-clack of keystrokes and “ding!” of the carriage return, Hanks has created Hanx Writer, an app that simulates using a typewriter.
 

Bloomsbury
September 2, 2014 | NPR · Growing up, I knew two kinds of apples: red and green. Then I started dating an apple enthusiast and discovered we are in the midst of a rare apple renaissance.
 

AFP/Getty Images
September 2, 2014 | NPR · Also: the man who dug through John Updike’s trash; a new biography of Robin Williams.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
September 2, 2014 | NPR · The instrumental hip-hop band’s third record is their first of completely original material.
 

Courtesy of the artist
September 2, 2014 | NPR · “The music that I make can be related to anybody all over the world,” Sinkane’s Ahmed Gallab says of his uprooted life, which informs a masterful blend of R&B, shoegaze, African and country music.
 

Courtesy of the artist
September 2, 2014 | WXPN · Chicago folk artist Crow Moses is a veteran of sorts in his city’s music scene, but the name might not be familiar.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab