Pueblo’s Arkansas Levee mural is a great example of how something widely perceived as negative (graffiti, in this case) can be turned into a cultural opportunity. Once a long and large slab of concrete designed to channel runoff of the Arkansas River from the Pueblo Reservoir, the Levee became a natural site for graffiti artists, many of them rather clever students back in the 1980s. While the city could have fought it, covering it with abstract blobs of leftover paint, they embraced it, let a group organize it and, at 3-miles long and growing, allowed it to turn into the world’s longest continuous painting (according to the Guiness Book of World Records).

Please enjoy this slideshow which is NOT completely comprehensive, unfortunately (hey, it was 104 degrees out there), but covers most of the 3-miles beginning at the west end and heads East, including the south side of the Levee at the east end, which is mostly devoted to murals by children. We also recommend clicking the four arrows in the lower-right-hand corner of the slideshow to watch it in full-screen mode for the greatest appreciation of its details.

For more information on the mural project, you can go HERE.

 

4 Responses to The Incredible Pueblo Levee Mural Art

  1. Pueblo Resident says:

    It may well be a cultural opportunity… to residents. But motorists driving by on I-25 don’t realize this and it ends up looking just like what it is, graffiti. In my opinion it, the rusting out hulks on steel mill property and the junk/scrap yard (both visible from the interstate), make Pueblo look like a run down cesspool. It’s not flattering and casts the wrong impression; that we don’t care about graffiti.

    Yes, it’s nice if you know the story… but if you don’t, it’s an eyesore.

  2. Laura Donavan says:

    Thanks for the photo essay. I really enjoyed it.

  3. COS resident says:

    Hey Pueblo, I used to clown on you a lot, but now I think you are pretty awesome, graffiti and scrapyards and all.

  4. 'Letta says:

    What an awesome slide show. The graffiti displayed took a lot of man hours and skill to be able to create art on the side of a sloping wall with a river below you. It takes talent to be able to create on such a large scale up close.

News

Getty Images
August 31, 2016 | NPR · NPR’s politics team annotated Trump’s speech on immigration, which comes after a week of seeming to change direction on the issue.
 

AP
August 31, 2016 | NPR · The president warns that climate change can undermine decades-long conservation efforts. He spoke at an annual summit that brings people together to discuss how to keep Lake Tahoe blue.
 

Elephants Without Borders
August 31, 2016 | NPR · A census of African savanna elephants in 15 countries between 2007 and 2014 found the population decreased by 144,000 animals.
 

Arts & Life

August 31, 2016 | NPR · Glen Campbell: I’ll Be Me follows the country singer’s goodbye tour and his decline from Alzheimer’s disease. NPR’s Robert Siegel talks to director James Keach and Campbell’s wife, Kim Campbell.
 

ABC Photo Archives/Getty Images
August 31, 2016 | NPR · TV has a bad guy problem. The rise of morally ambiguous anti-heroes like Tony Soprano has pushed chewier, more melodramatic villains aside. What we gained in nuance, we lost in sheer, hiss-worthy fun.
 

NPR
August 31, 2016 | NPR · Historical events both real (the 1968 Democratic Convention, Occupy Wall Street) and imagined come to life in this novel. Reviewer Jason Sheehan says it will make you laugh and break your heart.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
September 1, 2016 | NPR · In anticipation of a new album in 2017, Amelia Meath and Nick Sanborn have just released “Radio,” which matches propulsive electronics with scathing commentary about commodification.
 

NPR
August 31, 2016 | NPR · A day after performing “Hotter Than Hell” on The Tonight Show, the European pop star performed another one of her songs for a much smaller audience: our Noteworthy video crew.
 

August 31, 2016 | NPR · Glen Campbell: I’ll Be Me follows the country singer’s goodbye tour and his decline from Alzheimer’s disease. NPR’s Robert Siegel talks to director James Keach and Campbell’s wife, Kim Campbell.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab