Pueblo’s Arkansas Levee mural is a great example of how something widely perceived as negative (graffiti, in this case) can be turned into a cultural opportunity. Once a long and large slab of concrete designed to channel runoff of the Arkansas River from the Pueblo Reservoir, the Levee became a natural site for graffiti artists, many of them rather clever students back in the 1980s. While the city could have fought it, covering it with abstract blobs of leftover paint, they embraced it, let a group organize it and, at 3-miles long and growing, allowed it to turn into the world’s longest continuous painting (according to the Guiness Book of World Records).

Please enjoy this slideshow which is NOT completely comprehensive, unfortunately (hey, it was 104 degrees out there), but covers most of the 3-miles beginning at the west end and heads East, including the south side of the Levee at the east end, which is mostly devoted to murals by children. We also recommend clicking the four arrows in the lower-right-hand corner of the slideshow to watch it in full-screen mode for the greatest appreciation of its details.

For more information on the mural project, you can go HERE.

 

4 Responses to The Incredible Pueblo Levee Mural Art

  1. Pueblo Resident says:

    It may well be a cultural opportunity… to residents. But motorists driving by on I-25 don’t realize this and it ends up looking just like what it is, graffiti. In my opinion it, the rusting out hulks on steel mill property and the junk/scrap yard (both visible from the interstate), make Pueblo look like a run down cesspool. It’s not flattering and casts the wrong impression; that we don’t care about graffiti.

    Yes, it’s nice if you know the story… but if you don’t, it’s an eyesore.

  2. Laura Donavan says:

    Thanks for the photo essay. I really enjoyed it.

  3. COS resident says:

    Hey Pueblo, I used to clown on you a lot, but now I think you are pretty awesome, graffiti and scrapyards and all.

  4. 'Letta says:

    What an awesome slide show. The graffiti displayed took a lot of man hours and skill to be able to create art on the side of a sloping wall with a river below you. It takes talent to be able to create on such a large scale up close.

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