It’s with great admiration and sadness that we bid farewell to Colin Frazer, Printer of The Press at Colorado College for the past four years as he travels back east to get his Master of Fine Arts at the Rhode Island School of Design. Below is an audio slide show featuring Colin, his excellent book and poster work, and The Press. This piece was produced last fall, shortly after The Press reopened in its new home in Taylor Hall on the Colorado College campus. Good luck, Colin!

Founded by Jim Trissel in the late-1970s, The Press at Colorado College has long been a little-known sanctuary for the dying art of letterpress printmaking. But up until the summer of 2009, The Press was housed in a cramped and somewhat dank basement of a campus residence hall. After a nearly-190,000 pound move, The Press has now settled comfortably into its new home in Taylor Hall (the low stone building just east of Bemis Hall on the Colorado College Campus). In this slide show, outgoing printer and teacher Colin Frazer talk about his work, the move and the new shop.

 

4 Responses to Adieu to a Letterpress Printer

  1. Steve Lawson says:

    I was happy to see you post this, because I have similar feelings of “admiration and sadness” as I think about Colin leaving Colorado College. He is talented and friendly, and I only wish I had taken more time to work with him at the Press before now.

  2. Daisy says:

    I’m super excited for Colin and his new endeavors (to coin one of his favorite phrases ;-). He will be missed!

  3. Colin says:

    Aww, thanks folks. I am sad to leave the Press and all of the wonderful people in our small community. I’ll miss you too!

  4. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Jamie Berger. Jamie Berger said: The Press at Colorado College gets new digs while one of its letterpress printers moves on. http://bit.ly/aOyf4i […]

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