On April 14, Colorado College graduate Mark Fiore found out that he had made history as the first political cartoonist to win the Pulitzer Prize in an online-only format. For a decade now, Fiore, who graduated in 1991, has been creating Flash-animated web-cartoons skewering politicians and policies across the political spectrum.

Fiore also made headlines last month when Apple reversed their decision to deny his iPhone App after they learned that he’d won the Pulitzer.

We interviewed Mark Fiore last Friday about how he made the transition from print to digital and what it was like to win one of journalism’s most prestigious prizes. You can listen to the interview while you watch a slide show of Fiore’s cartoons while he was a student at Colorado College below:

Click HERE to find out more about Mark Fiore and watch more of his animated political cartoons.

(Many thanks to Emma Hatridge for her help documenting Fiore’s old political cartoons from the Catalyst. Thanks also to Jessy Randall at Tutt Library’s Special Collections.)

 

2 Responses to Pulitzer Cartoonist & CC Grad Mark Fiore

  1. Liz Arnold says:

    Thanks for the great interview with Mark. I graduated with Mark from CC in 1991, and my very first class there was called Satire and Caricature taught by Neil Reinitz. I remember it to be a fascinating and fun class. I can’t remember if Mark was in that class, but it seems like it would have been of interest to him, even then. Enjoyed hearing about what he is doing, and many congrats to him on the Pulitzer!

  2. daisy says:

    Great interview and slideshow, interesting how so many of the early 90′s era cartoons could be equally relevant today.
    Also loved his commentary on Apple’s role in the media marketplace. Thanks!

News

AP
March 30, 2015 | WDET · Tuesday is the deadline to begin what many call the largest U.S. mass tax foreclosure. With the city counting on tax revenue, the owners behind on payments may be forced out of their homes.
 

March 30, 2015 | NPR · The death-row population in the state is growing because no one has been put to death in nearly a decade. Gov. Jerry Brown is asking for more money to open 100 more cells.
 

AFP/Getty Images
March 30, 2015 | NPR · Airstrikes intensified as Houthi rebels advanced on the port city of Aden. Aid agencies say one airstrike killed dozens at a refugee camp, while Yemeni officials blamed rebel shelling.
 

Arts & Life

Courtesy of Michael Soi
March 30, 2015 | NPR · Kenya will participate in the Venice Biennale, the prestigious art show that opens on May 9. But only two of the artists representing Kenya will be Kenyan. Most aren’t even African — they’re Chinese.
 

March 30, 2015 | NET · More than a dozen federal agencies play a part in keeping food from making Americans sick. Critics say the system has gaps, and we’d all be safer if federal food safety efforts were under one roof.
 

Courtesy of Liveright
March 30, 2015 | NPR · Clive James was diagnosed with leukemia a few years ago. “There is a grief in all poetry,” he writes in his latest book of essays. “Poetry holds itself together, and eventually we ourselves do not.”
 

Music

March 30, 2015 | NPR · NPR music critic Will Hermes reviews an album that contains the best storytelling he’s heard in a long time. It’s the debut album from Courtney Barnett.
 

March 30, 2015 | NPR · Fresh Air jazz critic Kevin Whitehead says that Art Pepper played like he was making up for lost time.
 

Mountain Stage
March 30, 2015 | NPR · Delving into exploratory jams, the band plays songs from its new album live in West Virginia.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab