On April 14, Colorado College graduate Mark Fiore found out that he had made history as the first political cartoonist to win the Pulitzer Prize in an online-only format. For a decade now, Fiore, who graduated in 1991, has been creating Flash-animated web-cartoons skewering politicians and policies across the political spectrum.

Fiore also made headlines last month when Apple reversed their decision to deny his iPhone App after they learned that he’d won the Pulitzer.

We interviewed Mark Fiore last Friday about how he made the transition from print to digital and what it was like to win one of journalism’s most prestigious prizes. You can listen to the interview while you watch a slide show of Fiore’s cartoons while he was a student at Colorado College below:

Click HERE to find out more about Mark Fiore and watch more of his animated political cartoons.

(Many thanks to Emma Hatridge for her help documenting Fiore’s old political cartoons from the Catalyst. Thanks also to Jessy Randall at Tutt Library’s Special Collections.)


2 Responses to Pulitzer Cartoonist & CC Grad Mark Fiore

  1. Liz Arnold says:

    Thanks for the great interview with Mark. I graduated with Mark from CC in 1991, and my very first class there was called Satire and Caricature taught by Neil Reinitz. I remember it to be a fascinating and fun class. I can’t remember if Mark was in that class, but it seems like it would have been of interest to him, even then. Enjoyed hearing about what he is doing, and many congrats to him on the Pulitzer!

  2. daisy says:

    Great interview and slideshow, interesting how so many of the early 90’s era cartoons could be equally relevant today.
    Also loved his commentary on Apple’s role in the media marketplace. Thanks!


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