On April 14, Colorado College graduate Mark Fiore found out that he had made history as the first political cartoonist to win the Pulitzer Prize in an online-only format. For a decade now, Fiore, who graduated in 1991, has been creating Flash-animated web-cartoons skewering politicians and policies across the political spectrum.

Fiore also made headlines last month when Apple reversed their decision to deny his iPhone App after they learned that he’d won the Pulitzer.

We interviewed Mark Fiore last Friday about how he made the transition from print to digital and what it was like to win one of journalism’s most prestigious prizes. You can listen to the interview while you watch a slide show of Fiore’s cartoons while he was a student at Colorado College below:

Click HERE to find out more about Mark Fiore and watch more of his animated political cartoons.

(Many thanks to Emma Hatridge for her help documenting Fiore’s old political cartoons from the Catalyst. Thanks also to Jessy Randall at Tutt Library’s Special Collections.)

 

2 Responses to Pulitzer Cartoonist & CC Grad Mark Fiore

  1. Liz Arnold says:

    Thanks for the great interview with Mark. I graduated with Mark from CC in 1991, and my very first class there was called Satire and Caricature taught by Neil Reinitz. I remember it to be a fascinating and fun class. I can’t remember if Mark was in that class, but it seems like it would have been of interest to him, even then. Enjoyed hearing about what he is doing, and many congrats to him on the Pulitzer!

  2. daisy says:

    Great interview and slideshow, interesting how so many of the early 90′s era cartoons could be equally relevant today.
    Also loved his commentary on Apple’s role in the media marketplace. Thanks!

News

AP
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Keith A. Seilhan, who was the incident commander directing the company’s cleanup effort, allegedly sold $1 million in BP stock based on non-public information about the extent of the spill.
 

NASA/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Kepler-186f is almost the same size as Earth, and it orbits in its star’s “Goldilocks zone”– where temperatures may be just right for life. But much is unknown because it’s also 500 light years away.
 

iStockphoto
April 17, 2014 | NPR · It turns out the first chili peppers were grown by humans in eastern Mexico. And it’s not the same region where beans and corn were first grown, according to new ways of evaluating evidence.
 

Arts & Life

April 17, 2014 | NPR · Critic Maureen Corrigan recommends two graphic novels — one about a Yiddish advice column in the early 1900s and another about a regiment of African-American soldiers who fought during World War I.
 

Warner Brothers Pictures
April 17, 2014 | NPR · The new science fiction film Transcendence doesn’t work very well as a story, but it’s got an interesting way of trying to keep itself grounded in nature while exploring technological terrors.
 

April 17, 2014 | NPR · “Selfie” may have been the 2013 word of the year. But “belfies,” or “butt selfies” are now in the spotlight. We learn more about why they earned a fitness model a spread in Vanity Fair magazine.
 

Music

NPR
April 17, 2014 | NPR · The cousins have formed Black Jungle Squad, a collective of relatives and close friends. “Taking it back to the days when there was a lot more crews in hip-hop,” says Jeremiah. “Like Native Tongues.”
 

Courtesy of the artists
April 17, 2014 | NPR · We’re guessing some yoga and Pilates classes preceded a round of musical and physical one-upwomanship that’s gone viral.
 

Courtesy of the Kennedy Center
April 17, 2014 | WBGO · At the KC Jazz Club, Moran sets up two tunes with pre-produced sound montages, including a unique take on “Honeysuckle Rose.” Hear Moran’s long-running Bandwagon trio play Washington, D.C.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab