On April 14, Colorado College graduate Mark Fiore found out that he had made history as the first political cartoonist to win the Pulitzer Prize in an online-only format. For a decade now, Fiore, who graduated in 1991, has been creating Flash-animated web-cartoons skewering politicians and policies across the political spectrum.

Fiore also made headlines last month when Apple reversed their decision to deny his iPhone App after they learned that he’d won the Pulitzer.

We interviewed Mark Fiore last Friday about how he made the transition from print to digital and what it was like to win one of journalism’s most prestigious prizes. You can listen to the interview while you watch a slide show of Fiore’s cartoons while he was a student at Colorado College below:

Click HERE to find out more about Mark Fiore and watch more of his animated political cartoons.

(Many thanks to Emma Hatridge for her help documenting Fiore’s old political cartoons from the Catalyst. Thanks also to Jessy Randall at Tutt Library’s Special Collections.)

 

2 Responses to Pulitzer Cartoonist & CC Grad Mark Fiore

  1. Liz Arnold says:

    Thanks for the great interview with Mark. I graduated with Mark from CC in 1991, and my very first class there was called Satire and Caricature taught by Neil Reinitz. I remember it to be a fascinating and fun class. I can’t remember if Mark was in that class, but it seems like it would have been of interest to him, even then. Enjoyed hearing about what he is doing, and many congrats to him on the Pulitzer!

  2. daisy says:

    Great interview and slideshow, interesting how so many of the early 90’s era cartoons could be equally relevant today.
    Also loved his commentary on Apple’s role in the media marketplace. Thanks!

News

Bob Wick/Bureau of Land Management
February 12, 2016 | NPR · The new designations protect nearly 1.8 million acres of public lands which include Southern California’s highest peak, thousands of Native American rock carvings, endangered animals and a ghost town.
 

AP
February 12, 2016 | NPR · The annual event invites bird-watchers of all levels to count the birds in their backyards, and submit the data to researchers at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the National Audubon Society.
 

AP
February 12, 2016 | NPR · Pope Francis and Russian Orthodox Patriarch Kirill are meeting in Havana, Cuba. It’s the first time leaders of the two churches have met since a schism 1,000 years ago divided Christianity.
 

Arts & Life

Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures
February 12, 2016 | NPR · A War is a contender for the best foreign film Oscar. It’s about a soldier in Afghanistan placed in an impossible situation, and NPR film critic Bob Mondello says it brings the big questions home.
 

February 12, 2016 | NPR · Bordertown is about two families on both sides of the immigration debate. One is a white border patrol agent and his family and the other is a Mexican-American immigrant family.
 

Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images
February 12, 2016 | NPR · How will Aaron Sorkin’s rapid-fire dialogue fit with Harper Lee’s tale of racism and justice in the South?
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
February 12, 2016 | NPR · The Colbert bandleader sings “What A Wonderful World” in a 2011 session with guest host Jon Weber.
 

Getty Images
February 12, 2016 | NPR · Maybe this is all part of some performance-art piece we’ve been unwittingly sucked into. But either way, it seems to be working.
 

Courtesy of the artist
February 12, 2016 | NPR · A career-long hitmaker, Warren knows how to write about intimacy and heartbreak. But when she collaborated with Lady Gaga for a song about sexual assault, it unlocked a few stories she’d never shared.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab