On April 14, Colorado College graduate Mark Fiore found out that he had made history as the first political cartoonist to win the Pulitzer Prize in an online-only format. For a decade now, Fiore, who graduated in 1991, has been creating Flash-animated web-cartoons skewering politicians and policies across the political spectrum.

Fiore also made headlines last month when Apple reversed their decision to deny his iPhone App after they learned that he’d won the Pulitzer.

We interviewed Mark Fiore last Friday about how he made the transition from print to digital and what it was like to win one of journalism’s most prestigious prizes. You can listen to the interview while you watch a slide show of Fiore’s cartoons while he was a student at Colorado College below:

Click HERE to find out more about Mark Fiore and watch more of his animated political cartoons.

(Many thanks to Emma Hatridge for her help documenting Fiore’s old political cartoons from the Catalyst. Thanks also to Jessy Randall at Tutt Library’s Special Collections.)

 

2 Responses to Pulitzer Cartoonist & CC Grad Mark Fiore

  1. Liz Arnold says:

    Thanks for the great interview with Mark. I graduated with Mark from CC in 1991, and my very first class there was called Satire and Caricature taught by Neil Reinitz. I remember it to be a fascinating and fun class. I can’t remember if Mark was in that class, but it seems like it would have been of interest to him, even then. Enjoyed hearing about what he is doing, and many congrats to him on the Pulitzer!

  2. daisy says:

    Great interview and slideshow, interesting how so many of the early 90’s era cartoons could be equally relevant today.
    Also loved his commentary on Apple’s role in the media marketplace. Thanks!

News

Stuart Palley for NPR
September 26, 2016 | NPR · Troops in Iraq and Afghanistan are far more likely to develop post-traumatic stress disorder if they have suffered a concussion. The reason may be a change in the brain’s fear circuits.
 

ASSOCIATED PRESS
September 25, 2016 | NPR · In the 1960s, Palmer became golf’s first TV star. His good looks and charm were as important to promoting the sport as his 62 PGA victories. His competition with Jack Nicklaus also excited the fans.
 

September 25, 2016 | NPR · Adam Sharp, head of News and Government at Twitter talks to Michel Martin about the role of Twitter during Monday’s presidential debates.
 

Arts & Life

September 25, 2016 | NPR · Iconic journalist Studs Terkel was creating a best-seller, when he interviewed people around the U.S. for his book Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do.
 

NASA
September 25, 2016 | NPR · Back in the days of the Space Race, “computers” were people — often women — who performed vital calculations. Hidden Figures tells the stories of the women who got some of the first men to space.
 

Courtesy of the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives
September 25, 2016 | NPR · For decades, residents in Santa Fe, N.M., have gathered to burn a massive puppet — but only after stuffing it with symbols of their woes. It’s a way to release the past year’s sadness and start anew.
 

Music

September 25, 2016 | NPR · Michel Martin chats with David Kamp about his Vanity Fair interview with Bruce Springsteen. In the book, called Born to Run, Springsteen opens up about his life and his history with mental illness.
 

September 25, 2016 | NPR · Stanley “Buckwheat” Dural Jr., was known as an international ambassador for Louisiana roots music with his genre-leaping band Buckwheat Zydeco.
 

September 25, 2016 | NPR · It’s the first time Jann Wenner has allowed an outside investor to buy a part of the fabled magazine he founded in 1967.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab