We’re going to try something different this time for The Big Something Book Club. Rather than keeping the topic/author strictly local, we’re going to join the #1b1t (aka 1 Book 1 Twitter) discussion started by Wired Magazine contributing editor Jeff Howe. NPR did a story on how this all came about, which you can listen to here:

The book chosen for this first global Twitter book club is the excellent and amazing American Gods by Neil Gaiman. We’re already a little bit behind on the reading schedule (which began on May 5 with Chapters 1-3, but it’s only 3 chapters a week). We hope you’ll participate in the Twitter discussion, or just follow along with all the great links and thoughts by the hundreds of folks around the world contributing their thoughts about the many Gods and ideas in the novel. You can also learn more about it HERE at Wired Magazine‘s website with a complete breakdown of the reading and discussion schedule.

We’ll meet in person after the online discussion finishes on Thursday, July 8 at the front table in Poor Richard’s Booktore at 6 p.m..

As always, we highly recommend picking up a new or used copy at one of the fine local bookstores here in town, or at the public library.

 

One Response to Big Something Book Club: American Gods by Neil Gaiman

  1. Cathy Kleinsmith says:

    Sounds better than “Schulz”!!!

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