National Record Store Day this past weekend inspired us to go digging through KRCC’s extensive collection of vinyl to see what visual gems we might find. What grabbed us more than anything as we browsed were the dark scribbles on the covers of a whole category of music in the FOLK section. “WOMENS MUSIC” it said beneath the scribbles. All of it had since been reclassified as FOLK. But these albums, most of which were recorded between 1975 and 1982, which closely parallels the most vital years of the punk movement, are also deeply unconventional where politics and image are concerned. Like punk, this genre’s heyday seems to have ended at the advent of MTV. Go figure. Here’s a slide show of some of the artifacts from that era: album covers from our collection and four songs we digitized for you to stream.


“Angry Atthis” by Maxine Feldman

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“Crazy” by Kathy Fire

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“Ode to a Gym Teacher” by Meg Christian

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“Amazon ABC” by Alex Dobkin

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3 Responses to Women's Music Revisited

  1. chrisN says:

    So, do you know how and why the black marker scribbles got there?

  2. Noel Black says:

    The station reclassified them as FOLK. All the records get marked up so as to be less desirable to potential thieves. It wa just interesting that they had been classified under a genre we weren’t previously aware existed as a stand-alone.

  3. Nancy Wilsted says:

    Great job for including Meg, although musically she didn’t compare to Chris Williamson. Try “Waterfall” for the ultimate 70’s lesbian swoon. Also Lavender Jane’s “The Woman in Your Life”, or “Because She’s a Woman”. Ol’Jan McMillan better not find out you “weren’t aware”. Weren’t aware? She’ll come down to that station and whup you!

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