It’s hard to believe that KRCC will be 60 years old next year! Just to put that in context, we’re 20 years older than National Public Radio (which will be turning 40 next year). When cultural institutions have been around as long as KRCC, it can be easy to forget that it hasn’t always been here and that it remains a fluid organization created, molded and sustained by groups of individuals and their visions. One of the most influential individuals in the station’s history is, undoubtedly, Mario Valdes. As station manager from 1978 to 2006, Mario transformed KRCC from a small college/community station into an NPR Member Station in 1984 and proceeded to bring great programming, concerts and much more to Southern Colorado.

His vision is remembered here by designer Mike Daymon who worked closely with Mario over the years to create many of the newsletters, t-shirts and concert posters that graphically defined KRCC within the community.

If you appreciate having KRCC and all it brings to our community and haven’t already joined or renewed, please help us continue the great legacy that Mario and others gave us.

Thanks!

 

5 Responses to A Brief Design History of KRCC

  1. [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by KRCC. KRCC said: A Brief Design History of KRCC: It’s hard to believe that KRCC will be 60 years old next year! Just to put that in… http://bit.ly/9gVJZo [...]

  2. Mary Ellen says:

    WHAT WONDERFUL DESIGNS! They still look fresh 20 years later! –Mary Ellen Davis

  3. Diann says:

    Fantastic trip down memory lane! Thanks for sharing.

  4. B. Casados says:

    Great piece–thanks for the comments and pictures. Mario and Lyn were founding voices of the radio station that I’ve belonged to for over 25 years. Fond as I am of the current radio voices, I still miss Mario and Lyn’s voices. RIP.

  5. Joy Daymon says:

    It is always good to see Mike Daymon’s amazing talent noted. I gave birth to the guy some years ago. (He also helps me with my books- otherwise I wouldn’t have any.)

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