It’s hard to believe that KRCC will be 60 years old next year! Just to put that in context, we’re 20 years older than National Public Radio (which will be turning 40 next year). When cultural institutions have been around as long as KRCC, it can be easy to forget that it hasn’t always been here and that it remains a fluid organization created, molded and sustained by groups of individuals and their visions. One of the most influential individuals in the station’s history is, undoubtedly, Mario Valdes. As station manager from 1978 to 2006, Mario transformed KRCC from a small college/community station into an NPR Member Station in 1984 and proceeded to bring great programming, concerts and much more to Southern Colorado.

His vision is remembered here by designer Mike Daymon who worked closely with Mario over the years to create many of the newsletters, t-shirts and concert posters that graphically defined KRCC within the community.

If you appreciate having KRCC and all it brings to our community and haven’t already joined or renewed, please help us continue the great legacy that Mario and others gave us.

Thanks!

 

5 Responses to A Brief Design History of KRCC

  1. [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by KRCC. KRCC said: A Brief Design History of KRCC: It’s hard to believe that KRCC will be 60 years old next year! Just to put that in… http://bit.ly/9gVJZo [...]

  2. Mary Ellen says:

    WHAT WONDERFUL DESIGNS! They still look fresh 20 years later! –Mary Ellen Davis

  3. Diann says:

    Fantastic trip down memory lane! Thanks for sharing.

  4. B. Casados says:

    Great piece–thanks for the comments and pictures. Mario and Lyn were founding voices of the radio station that I’ve belonged to for over 25 years. Fond as I am of the current radio voices, I still miss Mario and Lyn’s voices. RIP.

  5. Joy Daymon says:

    It is always good to see Mike Daymon’s amazing talent noted. I gave birth to the guy some years ago. (He also helps me with my books- otherwise I wouldn’t have any.)

News

Reuters/Landov
December 18, 2014 | NPR · The decision to normalize relations is driving all kinds of speculation about American food companies opening up shop in Cuba. But analysts say: Don’t expect to see McDonald’s there anytime soon.
 

December 18, 2014 | NPR · In independent review panel calls for changes ranging from a better fence at the White House to a new approach to training and leadership within the Secret Service.
 

December 18, 2014 | NPR · The Justice Department’s move is a reversal from how the Bush administration interpreted Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.
 

Arts & Life

Film Movement
December 18, 2014 | NPR · The film If You Don’t, I Will has some strong dialogue and performances, but its tale of a marriage in peril sags too often in its recounting of the journey.
 

Courtesy of Serial
December 18, 2014 | NPR · Serial, the hugely popular (and sometimes controversial) podcast spun off from This American Life, wraps up its first season today. Audie Cornish speaks with Serial creator Sarah Koenig.
 

Getty Images
December 18, 2014 | NPR · Ahead of The Colbert Report‘s last episode, Fresh Air listens back to interviews with Colbert. “I didn’t realize quite how liberal I was until I was asked to make passionate comedic choices,” he said.
 

Music

December 18, 2014 | NPR · Cuban rhythms and melodies have been part of what’s been called the most American of art forms — jazz — ever since Jelly Roll Morton first heard them in the port of New Orleans and used them in his music. Josephine Baker performed in Cuba and Nat King Cole recorded there. But the revolution made cultural exchange all but impossible and even supposedly open-minded artists and musicians took sides.
 

December 18, 2014 | NPR · In contrast to many of her peers, Portland-based musician Lori Henriques’ music for kids is rooted in jazz. Her latest album is How Great Can This Day Be.
 

Courtesy of the artist
December 18, 2014 | NPR · When she’s at her most vulnerable as a woman, she’s at her best creatively. The same way Mary J. Blige’s pain drove My Life, Nicki’s believable heartache steals the show on The Pinkprint.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab