The state senate watered down a bill that seeks to clarify whether rafters have the right to float through private property. Lawmakers have turned it into a study, but the bill still needs a final vote in the senate before it can move forward. Bente Birkeland has more from the state capitol.

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2 Responses to Rafting Bill Watered Down

  1. TheSolly says:

    My friend is lucky enough to own river front property near Salida. Because the river is fairly slow right there rafters often stop to wait for others to catch up, and a few have come ashore for a break or to check their location on a map. This means coming ashore on my friend’s property. Not once has there ever been an issue, no litter, and the rafters are always polite and pleasant. If someone else has had a different experience, then I can’t fault the owners, but it sounds to me like rich people crying MINE just for the sake of it.

  2. [...] at us and instead of standing up and playing ball, we’re ducking,” he says (listen via KRCC radio). “We’re playing dodgeball.” Share or Bookmark This [...]

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