Agricultural historian Bonnie Lynn-Sherow closes Colorado College’s State of the Rockies series tonight, with a talk on “The Mythological Power of the Family Farm.” The Kansas State University history professor connects the history of the family farm ideal with Jeffersonian principles. KRCC’s Michelle Mercer spoke with Lynn-Sherow about that history, and met up with some eastern Colorado farmers to see how the Jeffersonian ideal holds up today.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Disclaimer: Colorado College is KRCC’s licensee.

 

5 Responses to Jeffersonian Ideals and the State of Farms

  1. Lisa says:

    Lynn-Sherow is a genius. Everyone should worship her. I love the mellifluous sound of her voice. 🙂 Very interesting segment.

  2. John says:

    Michelle’s stories are always well-crafted and bring a local yet universal touch to the subject at hand. It’s hard not to come away with a bit more insight than before. And… I love the mellifluous sound of her voice. 🙂

  3. Lauren says:

    Very interesting segment! What with all this fake-argument in Texas about the religious commitment of the founders, it takes experts in their field like Lynn-Sherow to remind us of the facts! Great job!

  4. […] Life. Leave a Comment Just what makes a family farm a “Family Farm?” Journalist and NPR contributor Michelle Mercer recently spoke with Farm Bureau members John and Susan Leach about what […]

  5. Brenda says:

    Bonnie Lynn-Sherow, Kansas State History Professor and a native Canadian, brings her wealth of historical knowledge and applies it to the past and present farmer and his community. She is able to unmask the facade, first presented by Jefferson….very informative and interesting listen! Thank you Professor Lynn-Sherow for enlightening us!

News

AP
August 23, 2016 | NPR · The country faces one of the worst humanitarian crises in the world. But the brutal rape has left aid agencies wondering whether to pull out their foreign staff.
 

AP
August 23, 2016 | NPR · John Lennon once fought a deportation order to stay in the U.S. His lawyer uncovered documents that eventually led to a program to temporarily protect unauthorized immigrants from deportation.
 

AP
August 23, 2016 | NPR · The 3-1 decision by the National Labor Relations Board reverses a 2004 ruling and opens the door to union drives at private universities across the country.
 

Arts & Life

Getty Images
August 23, 2016 | FA · Biographer Marc Fisher says Donald Trump has lived a “strikingly solitary life given how public he is.” Fisher and his Washington Post colleague Michael Kranish are the authors of Trump Revealed.
 

The Kobal Collection
August 23, 2016 | NPR · The Fire Still (Side)Burns: Jackman recently took to social media to shave off the distinctive facial hair he sported for the role of Wolverine. Those mutton chops are not handling the breakup well.
 

Courtesy of Charleston Tea Plantation
August 23, 2016 | NPR · The only commercial tea plantation in North America is located on Wadmalaw Island, S.C. It makes tea from bushes descended from plants first brought here in the 1700s. We chat with its tea taster.
 

Music

August 23, 2016 | FA · The singer-songwriter began performing at age 14 in a band with her sisters and her father. Critic Ken Tucker says the songs on Loveless’ latest solo album, Real, have a “tough edge.”
 

Mountain Stage
August 23, 2016 | NPR · Fulks continues to explore the subversive side of bluegrass and country on his latest album, Upland Stories. Hear him perform live in Lexington, Ky.
 

Courtesy of the artist
August 23, 2016 | NPR · Let a panel of 10 public-radio hosts recommend you some new music, including songs by Warpaint and Noname, plus a premiere from Tom Brosseau.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab