Agricultural historian Bonnie Lynn-Sherow closes Colorado College’s State of the Rockies series tonight, with a talk on “The Mythological Power of the Family Farm.” The Kansas State University history professor connects the history of the family farm ideal with Jeffersonian principles. KRCC’s Michelle Mercer spoke with Lynn-Sherow about that history, and met up with some eastern Colorado farmers to see how the Jeffersonian ideal holds up today.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Disclaimer: Colorado College is KRCC’s licensee.

 

5 Responses to Jeffersonian Ideals and the State of Farms

  1. Lisa says:

    Lynn-Sherow is a genius. Everyone should worship her. I love the mellifluous sound of her voice. :) Very interesting segment.

  2. John says:

    Michelle’s stories are always well-crafted and bring a local yet universal touch to the subject at hand. It’s hard not to come away with a bit more insight than before. And… I love the mellifluous sound of her voice. :-)

  3. Lauren says:

    Very interesting segment! What with all this fake-argument in Texas about the religious commitment of the founders, it takes experts in their field like Lynn-Sherow to remind us of the facts! Great job!

  4. […] Life. Leave a Comment Just what makes a family farm a “Family Farm?” Journalist and NPR contributor Michelle Mercer recently spoke with Farm Bureau members John and Susan Leach about what […]

  5. Brenda says:

    Bonnie Lynn-Sherow, Kansas State History Professor and a native Canadian, brings her wealth of historical knowledge and applies it to the past and present farmer and his community. She is able to unmask the facade, first presented by Jefferson….very informative and interesting listen! Thank you Professor Lynn-Sherow for enlightening us!

News

AP
February 6, 2016 | NPR · Again, the Republicans engaged in an intense brawl that was framed by Carson’s delayed entrance and an tough confrontation between Chris Christie and Marco Rubio.
 

February 6, 2016 | NPR · It was the last debate before the New Hampshire primary and Donald Trump was back onstage. Which GOP candidate ended up with the most talking time?
 

Getty Images
February 6, 2016 | NPR · Marco Rubio fast became a target, Donald Trump kept a lower profile and Ted Cruz, who won in Iowa, was on defense straight off the bat.
 

Arts & Life

WireImage
February 6, 2016 | NPR · Game of Thrones may have killed off many major characters, but the manipulative, scheming Queen Cersei is still standing. We’ve invited Headey to play a game called “You win and you die.”
 

February 6, 2016 | NPR · NPR’s Ina Jaffe talks with Scott Simon about the struggle to find the right words to describe older people. Longevity and lifestyles have changed and the language hasn’t kept up.
 

AP
February 6, 2016 | NPR · Daring visual artists, whose edgy work challenges religious and political taboos, have become a critical voice in the conservative kingdom — where open calls for reform are a criminal offense.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
February 6, 2016 | NPR · With more than 80 world premieres to her credit, Barbrara Hannigan, an intrepid soprano and conductor, has a knack for making modern music sound effortless and approachable.
 

Coldplay Music/YouTube
February 6, 2016 | NPR · These days, it’s pretty much impossible to miss a discussion on cultural appropriation. But we explore where we draw the line between what’s acceptable and what’s downright offensive.
 

Courtesy of the artist
February 6, 2016 | NPR · The duo School of Seven Bells wrote its final album together in 2012. Alejandra Deheza didn’t know then that her bandmate and songwriting partner wouldn’t live to see its release.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab