Agricultural historian Bonnie Lynn-Sherow closes Colorado College’s State of the Rockies series tonight, with a talk on “The Mythological Power of the Family Farm.” The Kansas State University history professor connects the history of the family farm ideal with Jeffersonian principles. KRCC’s Michelle Mercer spoke with Lynn-Sherow about that history, and met up with some eastern Colorado farmers to see how the Jeffersonian ideal holds up today.

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Disclaimer: Colorado College is KRCC’s licensee.

 

5 Responses to Jeffersonian Ideals and the State of Farms

  1. Lisa says:

    Lynn-Sherow is a genius. Everyone should worship her. I love the mellifluous sound of her voice. πŸ™‚ Very interesting segment.

  2. John says:

    Michelle’s stories are always well-crafted and bring a local yet universal touch to the subject at hand. It’s hard not to come away with a bit more insight than before. And… I love the mellifluous sound of her voice. πŸ™‚

  3. Lauren says:

    Very interesting segment! What with all this fake-argument in Texas about the religious commitment of the founders, it takes experts in their field like Lynn-Sherow to remind us of the facts! Great job!

  4. […] Life. Leave a Comment Just what makes a family farm a “Family Farm?” Journalist and NPR contributor Michelle Mercer recently spoke with Farm Bureau members John and Susan Leach about what […]

  5. Brenda says:

    Bonnie Lynn-Sherow, Kansas State History Professor and a native Canadian, brings her wealth of historical knowledge and applies it to the past and present farmer and his community. She is able to unmask the facade, first presented by Jefferson….very informative and interesting listen! Thank you Professor Lynn-Sherow for enlightening us!

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