(DISCLAIMER: Some people may find images in this slideshow disturbing.)

After waiting a week after the January 12, 2010 earthquake in Haiti to hear back from a variety volunteer organizations that take doctors to disaster areas, Colorado Springs-based Orthopedic Surgeon Rick Meinig felt compelled to take matters into his own hands. Using connections he found mostly through Facebook, he rounded up a team of doctors, 1,000 lbs of donated medical supplies and a private plane to go to Haiti and help the wounded. In the week they were there, Meinig and his team helped over 100 people with excruciating wounds and fractures. Though they performed many amputations during their time there, they were also able to help many save their limbs.

In this first part of of a two-part interview and slide show, Meinig talks about why he went to such great lengths to get to Haiti and about the devastation he witnessed. In Part 2, tomorrow, Meinig will walk us through images of some of the remarkable surgeries he and his team performed.

Click HERE for Part 2.

(Thanks so much for your feedback in the comments below or by email: thebigsomething@krcc.org.)

 

4 Responses to A Local Surgeon's Journey In Haiti, Part 1

  1. Laura Donavan says:

    Thank you Noel for covering this story. A tremendous undertaking by Dr Meinig and his group.

  2. Sandra says:

    What beautiful children! Thank you Dr. Meinig, for helping their country.

  3. Vincent Reginalds says:

    Millions have lost everything in the quake – homes, food, jobs! For the next 12 months, the World Food Programme says 2 million people will need critical food assistance! If you want to help and learn more about the crisis response, go to: http://wfp.org/crisis/haiti> or you can text FRIENDS to 90999 to make a $5 donation.

  4. ted eastburn md says:

    i’ve known rick a long time. rick’s medical relief efforts are consistent with everything i know of him personally and is a clear demonstration of his humanity and commitment to those in need. he reminds the rest of why we became physicians in the first place.
    every young medical student or physician in training imagines the day when they can make a dramatic difference in the lives of those that are suffering. on our medical school applications, when asked to write the narrative of why we want to be a doctor, none of us said ‘i want to be a physician so i can live in the broadmoor, drive a mercedes, and have a weekend home in the mountains’. each of us wrote or interviewed something to the effect of exactly what rick has in fact done in haiti. thank you rick for setting the bar high for all of us and i find myself reflecting on how i want to allocate my time as a physician in the years i have left in my professional life.

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