Call it outsider, self-taught, folk, primitive, indigenous or anything you want. Regardless, the artworks in the “Seeing Stories” exhibition at Colorado College’s I.D.E.A. Space represent some of the most recognizable examples of a 1990s art-world movement that redefined what it meant to be an “artist” and to be collectible. Australian Aboriginal Dreamtime paintings, 19th Century ledger drawings by the North Cheyenne and works by Henry Darger, John Muafangejo and Mose Tolliver, aka Mose T will all be on display.

Luckily for us, locally-based collector Mary Allen-Meilinger just so happens to have a large collection of Mose Tolliver’s artworks, which are on display at the “Seeing Stories” exhibition. Allen-Meilinger amassed her collection over while living in Montgomery, Alabama. For more information about her and Tolliver there’s an excellent and comprehensive article by the Independent‘s Matt Schniper HERE.

Above, you can watch a guided audio-slide show of Tolliver images explicated by Allen-Meilinger.

Complete information on the gallery opening HERE.

Thanks for your comments. We read them and appreciate them. thebigsomething@krcc.org

 

4 Responses to Tour de Mose T

  1. daisy says:

    I’m so glad you did this Noel, such an interesting story (take time to read the article, the backstory is really something).
    We’re thrilled to have the works on loan through March. We’d like to personally invite all the Big Something subscribers and friends of KRCC to come see the show, on display in the IDEA Space Tuesday-Saturday, 12:30-7 pm. Always free and open to the public.

  2. Marina Eckler says:

    Great show IDEA Space- especially enjoyed standing in front of the aboriginal drawings. They are fantastic and pulse with life and stories.

  3. Sarah Milteer says:

    I loved this so much I watched it twice and have been to the show twice. Thank you for this marvelous preview.

  4. Hiker gal says:

    Marvellous. Simple. Thoroughly honest.

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