Denver Post Capture 575

It’s interesting to watch newspapers, television stations and radio stations converge here on the web. Increasingly, all media outlets are just that: media outlets. Or perhaps, multi-media outlets would be more accurate. And while many lament (rightly) the demise of the daily newspaper, the daily newspaper is having to reinvent itself (rightly) for the web. And in this case, it’s doing a great job.

As you’ll see when you click to THIS AMAZING STORY at The Denver Post, video, audio, photography and the written word have all converged in one place on this monumentally ambitious military coming-of-age story. It’s about young Ian Fisher, and it ends here in Colorado Springs. (We can only imagine how much this all cost to produce!)

For our limited money, the photos alone are worthy of a Pulitzer, but it’s worth exploring this whole piece and all the well-designed links just for the sheer number of internet-friendly mediums used to cover it and cover it well: a program that turned the article into a page-turning book, videos that intermix pictures with video and audio independently, an “extras” page that features a photo-animation of pictures taken inside a humvee that’s set to music. Then there’s a glossary of Army ranks and acronyms. It’s like a DVD with extras. It goes on and on!

Is it too much? Regardless, it’s truly dizzying and it’s yet another excellent piece of journalism that helps flesh-out the broader picture of our ongoing involvement in the wars overseas and how they affect families here at home.

On that subject, don’t forget that the first Big Something Book Club featuring Jon Krakauer’s latest book Where Men Win Glory meets this Thursday evening. Details HERE.

(Thanks for your comments! thebigsomething@krcc.org)

Kudos to the Denver Post a

 

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