Bonnie Nadzam, who we interviewed this past August, will read tomorrow night in McHugh Commons on the Colorado College campus at 7 p.m. Full details HERE. You can listen to Bonnie read a portion of her novel and listen to an interview below.

gb nadzam headshot

In literature, examining taboos is often the quickest way to open the heart of a culture’s darkest fears and secrets. What we most abhor often marks the limits of our shared identity. So what happens when we cross those lines? For Bonnie Nadzam, the Daehler Fellow in Creative Writing at Colorado College, the question was the portal into her yet unpublished novel, LAMB. Like Lolita before it, LAMB leads you quickly into a dark moral wood and lulls you into the rhythm of its language. By the time you realize that what’s happening, it has already happened and you’re hooked. And that’s all in the first chapter.

DISCLAIMER: THE FOLLOWING CHAPTER IN BOTH WRITTEN AND RECORDED FORM CONTAINS ADULT SITUATIONS AND LANGUAGE.

You can listen to Ms. Nadzam read the first chapter of LAMBhere (or download it at the bottom of the post):

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Or you can download in PDF format HERE and read it yourself. (LAMB by Bonnie Nadzam. Copyright © 2009 by Bonnie Nadzam. Reprinted by permission of Georges Borchardt, Inc. on behalf of the author. All rights reserved.)

You can also listen to a brief interview we did with Ms. Nadzam here:

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Bonnie Nadzam will be teaching fiction writing at CC this year. She has short stories published and forthcoming in The Kenyon Review, The Alaska Quarterly Review, The Mississippi Review, Callaloo, Ninth Letter, and others. She is the fiction editor for 42opus.

(We plan to keep featuring fiction and other writings by folks from within the Pikes Peak Community and those passing through. If you’d like your work to be considered, please send us a short sample to thebigsomething@krcc.org. Let us know what you think of this in the comments below. We appreciate it! Thanks.)

Downloadable version of Chapter 1 of LAMB:

 

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