DISCLAIMER: This slideshow contains a few instances of colorful adult language.

Though you may not know the name Blaise Larmee, you might remember his spectacular helmet of hair and his artwork when he went to Colorado College a few years back: wistful and elegant cartoonish black and white figures being wistful and elegant, and (in the case of a particularly notable Leechpit T-shirt) riding scooters and giving the bird to the universe. His talent for line and figure were obvious.

Since leaving Colorado Springs he has completed a 90-page graphic novel, published lots of wonderful little zines on HIS BLOG and in small print runs, and had a piece published in the recent Fantagraphics Anthology: Abstract Comics: The Anthology.

Now a resident of Portland, Oregon, Blaise was kind enough to send us a big batch of images and spoke with us about his process and the things he’s done since leaving Colorado Springs.

 

7 Responses to Blogging Comics Into Zines

  1. adam degraff says:

    “if I met myself I wouldn’t understand myself and that’s okay”

    yes

    yoko ono cover my favorite

    also nice reversal in

    “making things that are pretty, but not beautiful”

  2. Noel Black says:

    “If I met myself” — That was my favorite line too!

  3. Sandra says:

    Wonderful work! Thank you for sharing your art, Blaise.
    (P. S. I, too, love that line.)

  4. Mike Procell says:

    For some reason it made me think of a quote Satchel Paige might add: “how old would you be if you didn’t know how old you are”

  5. jen says:

    HI I JUST WANTED TO TELL YOU I ONLY LIKED MAYBE 2 OF YOUR DRAWINGS AND I REALLY DIDN’T UNDERSTAND THEM . THEY LOOKED LIKE A LITTLE KIDS DRAWING .

  6. brenda starr says:

    which two?

  7. [...] school, Colorado College has been home to some fantastic student artists in recent years such as Blaise Larmee and Streeter Wright among quite a few [...]

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