Wandora Unit Cover

YA (Young Adult) fiction is perhaps epitomized by Judy Blume on one hand and J.D. Salinger on the other: angsty and precocious teen or pre-teen protagonists face life’s darker mysteries with little more than their wits and the vernacular. YA fiction spans all genres, however, and has been enjoying a surge in popularity in recent years among young adults and adults alike.
JessyRandallAuthorPic
Local author, poet and librarian Jessy Randall began writing her first YA Novel, The Wandora Unit, when she was still just barely out of high school 20 years ago. At the time she wrote it, she says, she was reading a lot of YA novels and was surprised to find there weren’t any books about poetry nerds like herself.

In this interview with The Big Something, Randall reads from the book and discusses the long road to publication and the difficulties and pleasures of the genre.

Jessy Randall Interview

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 

3 Responses to YA Novel for Poetry Nerds

  1. Sandra says:

    Wonderful interview. I’ve read Jessy’s brilliant book and while there’s a lot to admire what I loved most was the authentic look at a nerdy, yes, but also fascinating teen subculture. I was not one of those kids in high school (though I became a writer later) and it was fun exploring their world. This book would make a great gift for any teen who is creative and bookish.

  2. suesun says:

    Great interview…. it’s always nice to hear a writer read. Congrats to Jessy!! The YA genre (my favorite) now has another wonderful addition!

  3. Margaret says:

    Now that was a captivating interview! Thank you, Jessy, for sharing your thoughts via the radio. And thank you for The Wandora Unit!

News

NPR
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Abhina Aher is a member of the country’s storied, yet marginalized, transgender community. Last week, the India’s highest court legally recognized the group as a new gender — neither male nor female.
 

AP
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Top Democrats have said recently that some GOP opposition to President Obama and his agenda is based on race. It’s an explosive message that might drive Democratic voters to the polls.
 

Martin Kaste/NPR
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Clam digging satisfies that primeval urge to go out into nature and find free food. And inveterate Washington state clam diggers admit they compete to get their daily limit of 15 clams.
 

Arts & Life

Getty Images
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Gabriel Garcia Marquez died Thursday. It would be hard to overstate the importance of his novels, but author Gustavo Arellano recommends getting to know him in a different medium.
 

Courtesy of Craig Schwartz Photography
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Dean’s “Paul Robeson” originally starred James Earl Jones when it opened on Broadway in 1978. It would go on to several revivals in New York and Europe.
 

Meredith Rizzo/NPR
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Gathered in Washington for a comic book convention, these costumed enthusiasts shared how their favorite characters would run the country.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Donald Fagen and Walter Becker are masters of irony and erudition. The pair perform their Steely Dan hit “Josie” and standards “Mood Indigo” and “Hesitation Blues.”
 

Courtesy of the artist
April 18, 2014 | WXPN · Today we’ve got a live performance with the Philadelphia-based band. We’ll also learn about perfectionist Adam Granduciel’s creative process and relationship with early band member Kurt Vile.
 

Courtesy of Press Junkie
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Singer-songwriter Gina Chavez may be a Texan, but on her latest album she reconnects with her Latin roots, singing in both English and Spanish. Up.Rooted blends Latin folk and American pop.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab