Wandora Unit Cover

YA (Young Adult) fiction is perhaps epitomized by Judy Blume on one hand and J.D. Salinger on the other: angsty and precocious teen or pre-teen protagonists face life’s darker mysteries with little more than their wits and the vernacular. YA fiction spans all genres, however, and has been enjoying a surge in popularity in recent years among young adults and adults alike.
JessyRandallAuthorPic
Local author, poet and librarian Jessy Randall began writing her first YA Novel, The Wandora Unit, when she was still just barely out of high school 20 years ago. At the time she wrote it, she says, she was reading a lot of YA novels and was surprised to find there weren’t any books about poetry nerds like herself.

In this interview with The Big Something, Randall reads from the book and discusses the long road to publication and the difficulties and pleasures of the genre.

Jessy Randall Interview

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3 Responses to YA Novel for Poetry Nerds

  1. Sandra says:

    Wonderful interview. I’ve read Jessy’s brilliant book and while there’s a lot to admire what I loved most was the authentic look at a nerdy, yes, but also fascinating teen subculture. I was not one of those kids in high school (though I became a writer later) and it was fun exploring their world. This book would make a great gift for any teen who is creative and bookish.

  2. suesun says:

    Great interview…. it’s always nice to hear a writer read. Congrats to Jessy!! The YA genre (my favorite) now has another wonderful addition!

  3. Margaret says:

    Now that was a captivating interview! Thank you, Jessy, for sharing your thoughts via the radio. And thank you for The Wandora Unit!

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