First of all, a gigantic THANK YOU to all the new and renewing KRCC members who made this Fall fund drive a spectacular success. Because of you, we were able to raise $200,000 in Just over a week! Thank you thank you. We’re thrilled to have the privilege of bringing you all our great on-air programming and features like this each day!

newyorkermasoncover

It’s not every day that you get a poem published in The New Yorker. In fact, given that they really only publish 47 issues/year and that they usually only run 2 or 3 poems per issue, your odds aren’t all that great, not counting the whole having-to-be-a-poet-in-the-first-place part of the equation.

That said, David Mason—Colorado College Professor and author of the much-lauded epic historical poem Ludlow—did just that: He got a poem published in what is probably the best-read magazine in the country that regularly publishes poems.

If you missed it, you can read the poem below and listen to a conversation with David in which he reads the poem, divulges HOW he did it, HOW MUCH money they paid him, and talks candidly about the fame that won’t stop following him, well… hear for yourself:

“Fathers and Sons” by David Mason

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

newyorkermasonpoem

 

4 Responses to How to Get a Poem Published in the New Yorker

  1. adam degraff says:

    great interview. always wondered about the new yorker. it is strange that a new editor doesn’t necessarily mean a new aesthetic. i remember reading this poem in the new yorker. refreshing to hear dave’s fear of showing it. i love noel’s last line here, “if the poets don’t do it…”

  2. Eva Syrovy says:

    I loved this poem – noticed it even though I’d no idea this was a Colorado author.

  3. Richard White says:

    I wrote my son today to say,
    the laughs, I might bring hiw way,
    will be okay.

  4. joey says:

    cool story. on a slightly related note, i used to love it when noel used to have those ‘best of bad poetry’ features in the indy. i distinctly remember him telling me that the reason he didn’t publish most of the submissions he received was because they were too good!

    anyways, props to dave mason.

News

August 23, 2014 | NPR · Ebola-stricken West Point is typically described as a slum in Monrovia’s capital city of Monrovia. That is true. But it is also a place of natural beauty and strong spirits.
 

WBHM
August 23, 2014 | WBHM · The state has some of the country’s most overcrowded — and troubled — prisons. Alabama is also home to a thriving life skills program that prison officials are fighting to save from budget slashes.
 

NPR
August 23, 2014 | NPR · With grand, provocative installations, Cai Guo-Qiang addresses the degradation of the country’s environment in a popular exhibit at a Shanghai art museum.
 

Arts & Life

August 23, 2014 | NPR · The younger Scarry, also an illustrator, found a draft of Best Lowly Worm Book Ever! in his dad’s Swiss chalet. He says all that was missing was the final art, “so that’s what I did.”
 

August 22, 2014 | NPR · The scent of fresh pencils is in the air, and homework assignments are around the corner. In honor of back-to-school season, author Alexander Aciman recommends The Lost Estate by Henri Alain-Fournier.
 

August 22, 2014 | NPR · Katy Simpson Smith’s novel, set during the American Revolution, was inspired by her research on mothers in the South. “Death was sort of the specter that haunted every aspect of life,” she says.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
August 23, 2014 | NPR · In song after song on the Detroit artist’s genre-hopping full-length debut, one thing is consistent: a powerful, undeniable voice.
 

Adam Kissick for NPR
August 23, 2014 | NPR · Shushing people at indoor concerts is understandable. What about events where options are greater?
 

August 22, 2014 | NPR · Our puzzler for careful listeners: This week, featuring fills and intros selected by Joe Easley, drummer for The Dismemberment Plan. Hear the fill (or intro) and match it to the song.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab