First of all, a gigantic THANK YOU to all the new and renewing KRCC members who made this Fall fund drive a spectacular success. Because of you, we were able to raise $200,000 in Just over a week! Thank you thank you. We’re thrilled to have the privilege of bringing you all our great on-air programming and features like this each day!

newyorkermasoncover

It’s not every day that you get a poem published in The New Yorker. In fact, given that they really only publish 47 issues/year and that they usually only run 2 or 3 poems per issue, your odds aren’t all that great, not counting the whole having-to-be-a-poet-in-the-first-place part of the equation.

That said, David Mason—Colorado College Professor and author of the much-lauded epic historical poem Ludlow—did just that: He got a poem published in what is probably the best-read magazine in the country that regularly publishes poems.

If you missed it, you can read the poem below and listen to a conversation with David in which he reads the poem, divulges HOW he did it, HOW MUCH money they paid him, and talks candidly about the fame that won’t stop following him, well… hear for yourself:

“Fathers and Sons” by David Mason

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

newyorkermasonpoem

 

4 Responses to How to Get a Poem Published in the New Yorker

  1. adam degraff says:

    great interview. always wondered about the new yorker. it is strange that a new editor doesn’t necessarily mean a new aesthetic. i remember reading this poem in the new yorker. refreshing to hear dave’s fear of showing it. i love noel’s last line here, “if the poets don’t do it…”

  2. Eva Syrovy says:

    I loved this poem – noticed it even though I’d no idea this was a Colorado author.

  3. Richard White says:

    I wrote my son today to say,
    the laughs, I might bring hiw way,
    will be okay.

  4. joey says:

    cool story. on a slightly related note, i used to love it when noel used to have those ‘best of bad poetry’ features in the indy. i distinctly remember him telling me that the reason he didn’t publish most of the submissions he received was because they were too good!

    anyways, props to dave mason.

News

Getty Images
July 5, 2015 | NPR · In the first five minutes, Carli Lloyd scored two swift goals. Lauren Holiday brought the score up to 3, and then Lloyd scored from midfield for a hat trick. The team led 4-0 after just 15 minutes.
 

July 5, 2015 | NPR · Greeks voted Sunday in a referendum that could decide whether the country stays in the eurozone. NPR’s Chris Arnold talks about the decisive vote against an austerity package from European leaders.
 

Xinhua/Landov
July 5, 2015 | NPR · The secretary of state, who has been in talks in Vienna for the past several days, says an agreement could be done “quickly” if Tehran is prepared to compromise.
 

Arts & Life

Getty Images
July 5, 2015 | NPR · It’s an understatement to call the man busy. With a new book out, a movie due soon and another wrapping up on set, Apatow caught a breath and reflected on stumbling blocks, Freaks and Amy Schumer.
 

Courtesy of Doubleday
July 5, 2015 | NPR · Initially, the CIA was suspicious of Soviet aviation expert Adolf Tolkachev. But he earned their trust — and provided blueprints, documents and plans that were crucial to the U.S.
 

July 5, 2015 | NPR · In each pair of clues, the answer to the first clue is a word that contains the consecutive letters A-R. Drop the A-R, and the remaining letters in order will form a word that answers the second clue.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
July 5, 2015 | NPR · At 25, Barthe was already writing songs for pop stars, but life outside the studio felt like a battlefield. She speaks with NPR’s Arun Rath about the hard road to her full-length debut.
 

July 5, 2015 | NPR · A new film by award-winning director Asif Kapadia explores the turbulent life of Amy Winehouse. NPR’s Lynn Neary speaks with the director about his film, which uses taped interviews and family videos to paint an intimate portrait of the late singer.
 

July 5, 2015 | NPR · On this week’s Wingin’ It, journalist and musician Sylvie Simmons talks to NPR’s Lynn Neary to share her favorite road trip song, “Bohemian Rhapsody,” by Queen.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab