First of all, a gigantic THANK YOU to all the new and renewing KRCC members who made this Fall fund drive a spectacular success. Because of you, we were able to raise $200,000 in Just over a week! Thank you thank you. We’re thrilled to have the privilege of bringing you all our great on-air programming and features like this each day!

newyorkermasoncover

It’s not every day that you get a poem published in The New Yorker. In fact, given that they really only publish 47 issues/year and that they usually only run 2 or 3 poems per issue, your odds aren’t all that great, not counting the whole having-to-be-a-poet-in-the-first-place part of the equation.

That said, David Mason—Colorado College Professor and author of the much-lauded epic historical poem Ludlow—did just that: He got a poem published in what is probably the best-read magazine in the country that regularly publishes poems.

If you missed it, you can read the poem below and listen to a conversation with David in which he reads the poem, divulges HOW he did it, HOW MUCH money they paid him, and talks candidly about the fame that won’t stop following him, well… hear for yourself:

“Fathers and Sons” by David Mason

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

newyorkermasonpoem

 

4 Responses to How to Get a Poem Published in the New Yorker

  1. adam degraff says:

    great interview. always wondered about the new yorker. it is strange that a new editor doesn’t necessarily mean a new aesthetic. i remember reading this poem in the new yorker. refreshing to hear dave’s fear of showing it. i love noel’s last line here, “if the poets don’t do it…”

  2. Eva Syrovy says:

    I loved this poem – noticed it even though I’d no idea this was a Colorado author.

  3. Richard White says:

    I wrote my son today to say,
    the laughs, I might bring hiw way,
    will be okay.

  4. joey says:

    cool story. on a slightly related note, i used to love it when noel used to have those ‘best of bad poetry’ features in the indy. i distinctly remember him telling me that the reason he didn’t publish most of the submissions he received was because they were too good!

    anyways, props to dave mason.

News

CBS
October 30, 2014 | NPR · Tonight marks the return of scripted programming on CBS after seven weeks of Thursday Night Football, including a new show, The McCarthys, that should have been left in the locker room.
 

NPR
October 30, 2014 | NPR · In part two of our look at the ancient Greek philosopher, we ask students at a California school about the Socratic teaching method and the questions it inspires.
 

October 30, 2014 | NPR · About 100 people were reported to have been in the building at Wichita’s Mid-Continent Airport at the time of the crash. Authorities said five others were injured.
 

Arts & Life

CBS
October 30, 2014 | NPR · Tonight marks the return of scripted programming on CBS after seven weeks of Thursday Night Football, including a new show, The McCarthys, that should have been left in the locker room.
 

Kino Lorber
October 30, 2014 | NPR · At 83, the Franco-Swiss auteur has made another complex visual poem, this time using 3D technology. The film bubbles with invention, thanks to jittery editing and a jumble of photographic styles.
 

Oil Documentary, LLC
October 30, 2014 | NPR · Margaret Brown’s soft-spoken documentary examines the aftermath of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The film recognizes an instinct toward simplistic polarization, but pushes gently against it.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
October 30, 2014 | NPR · As a solo artist, Damian Master is unbound by the metal in his catalog. “Born To Ruin” contains his most anthemic statement of purpose yet, curled under a swaggering riff and his fire-spitting bark.
 

Courtesy of the artist
October 30, 2014 | NPR · The Texas singer-songwriter revives the country archetype of the drifter in this reflective, gentle song about being in between homes.
 

NPR
October 30, 2014 | NPR · On record, Banks is at the center of lavish productions, each suitable for throbbing remixes and banks of swirling lights. Here, though, she serves notice as a powerful singer in her own right.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab