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It’s not every day that you get a poem published in The New Yorker. In fact, given that they really only publish 47 issues/year and that they usually only run 2 or 3 poems per issue, your odds aren’t all that great, not counting the whole having-to-be-a-poet-in-the-first-place part of the equation.

That said, David Mason—Colorado College Professor and author of the much-lauded epic historical poem Ludlow—did just that: He got a poem published in what is probably the best-read magazine in the country that regularly publishes poems.

If you missed it, you can read the poem below and listen to a conversation with David in which he reads the poem, divulges HOW he did it, HOW MUCH money they paid him, and talks candidly about the fame that won’t stop following him, well… hear for yourself:

“Fathers and Sons” by David Mason

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4 Responses to How to Get a Poem Published in the New Yorker

  1. adam degraff says:

    great interview. always wondered about the new yorker. it is strange that a new editor doesn’t necessarily mean a new aesthetic. i remember reading this poem in the new yorker. refreshing to hear dave’s fear of showing it. i love noel’s last line here, “if the poets don’t do it…”

  2. Eva Syrovy says:

    I loved this poem – noticed it even though I’d no idea this was a Colorado author.

  3. Richard White says:

    I wrote my son today to say,
    the laughs, I might bring hiw way,
    will be okay.

  4. joey says:

    cool story. on a slightly related note, i used to love it when noel used to have those ‘best of bad poetry’ features in the indy. i distinctly remember him telling me that the reason he didn’t publish most of the submissions he received was because they were too good!

    anyways, props to dave mason.


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