Founded by Jim Trissel in the late-1970s, The Press at Colorado College has long been a little-known sanctuary for the dying art of letterpress printmaking. But up until this past summer, the press was housed in a cramped and somewhat dank basement of a campus residence hall. After a nearly-190,000 pound move, the Press has now settled comfortably into its new home in Taylor Hall (the low stone building just east of Bemis Hall on the Colorado College Campus). We met with printer and teacher Colin Frazer for a quick tour of the press, which will open to the public tonight between 6 and 7 p.m. before a lecture by Betty Bright , the former curator and program director for the Minnesota Center for Book Arts, at the Cornerstone Theater.

(BTW, if you love The Big Something, we’re in the midst of our fall fund-drive and now is a great time renew, join for the first time or give a little something extra to KRCC online. Please include a note that you enjoy The Big Something. Thanks! thebigsomething@krcc.org)

 

4 Responses to A Tour of The New Press at CC

  1. I love the way you mix ambient sounds with the slide-show. It has a way of putting the taste of the place in your mouth per say. Very cool.

  2. Diann @ Rainy Days says:

    Ohhhh, this wonderful video and great news of the resurrection of The Press warms my heart. Having figuratively been born with “ink in my veins”, I was lucky enough to have met Jim Trissel, worked with him on some off-site print projects and visited him in that “dank” basement back in the early ’80’s. I still remember some of the beautiful hand bound books they were working on then. It’s certainly gratifying that Colorado College continues to support the continued art and craft of the printer in this digital age.

  3. ele says:

    The Press sure is looking good in that new space!

  4. S. McClow-Kinsey says:

    Great to see this update on The Press and know that it is again in operation. I have an edition of poems printed by Jim Trissel in the early 80’s, and it’s a real treasure. Thanks for tour.

News

Maya Sugarman/KPCC
March 25, 2017 | SCPR · A South LA clinic started by Muslim doctors and students has served mostly low-income Latino and African-American patients for 20 years. Staff and patients now say they worry about their future.
 

AP
March 25, 2017 | NPR · As many as 200 civilians were reported killed in western Mosul, where a US-led coalition is fighting ISIS. It’s not clear whether the rules of engagement have changed.
 

AP
March 25, 2017 | NPR · The Senate Republicans have the vote and clout to ensure Judge Neil Gorsuch is confirmed as Supreme Court justice. The only question is, how are the Democrats going to play their final losing cards.
 

Arts & Life

Getty Images
March 25, 2017 | NPR · Charley Pride, one of the first African-American stars in country music, has sold more records for RCA than anyone not named Elvis Presley.
 

Becky Harlan
March 25, 2017 | NPR · Many students at D.C.’s Capital City Charter School are first-generation Americans. For a creative writing project, a literacy nonprofit picked a topic everyone could relate to: food from home.
 

FX
March 25, 2017 | NPR · Wright plays an FBI secretary who falls in love with an undercover Russian spy. She says Martha is “who we would all most likely be” if we found ourselves in the world of The Americans.
 

Music

Getty Images
March 25, 2017 | NPR · Charley Pride, one of the first African-American stars in country music, has sold more records for RCA than anyone not named Elvis Presley.
 

Courtesy of the artist
March 25, 2017 | WXPN · Keep up with the latest and greatest new music with World Cafe‘s Spotify playlist, updated weekly.
 

Courtesy of the artist
March 25, 2017 | NPR · The folk-blues singer describes her creative process as “receiving” a song. “It usually starts with one voice,” she says, “And as soon as I hear one, then 500 more come in and surround it.”
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab