(Big Horn Sheep photo and “Before and After” photos courtesy Wanda Reaves)

Wanda Reaves, Project Manager for the Colorado Mountain Reclamation Foundation, recently invited The Big Something on morning sojourn up the Queens Canyon Quarry scar. Shrouded in mystery for the mere fact that it isn’t open to the public, Wanda helped us further demystify the history and understand the reclamation process. She also told us the fantastic history of the Big Horn Sheep herd that calls the scar home.

As we noted on Wednesday, this excursion was so interesting and long and wonderfully narrated in Ms. Reaves’ long Texas drawl, we broke this piece up into two parts. If you missed Part 1, you can watch it HERE.

GIGANTIC DISCLAIMER: THE DIVISION OF WILDLIFE HAS ASKED THAT PEOPLE REFRAIN FROM TRESPASSING ON THE QUEENS CANYON QUARRY SCAR BECAUSE THERE IS A VERY SENSITIVE AND SKITTISH HERD OF WILD BIG HORN SHEEP, WHICH IS ONE OF THE REASONS WHY ITS CLOSED TO THE PUBLIC. SO PLEASE, DON’T CONSIDER THIS FEATURE AN INVITATION TO ENTER THE SITE WITHOUT FIRST CONTACTING THE COLORADO MOUNTAIN RECLAMATION FOUNDATION.

 

9 Responses to Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About the Queens Canyon Quarry Scar, Part 2

  1. Lynette Reagan says:

    Wonderful information. Beautifully presented! I “scaled the scar” a year or two before they discontinued this one day hike. Truly memorable!

  2. Louise C says:

    So the reclamation work has been finished for eight years now. The hillside will never look the same as originally. Looks like there’s one more clean up effort needed: clean up and recycle as much as possible in the old barn (what a mess!) and tear down the barn. And why, with the public concern about “The Scar”, did the state reclamation laws never change to include the visual? There’s a huge, huge scar in process over near Cripple Creek. Have you been to the top of Pikes Peak and looked in that direction? Not pretty.

  3. Hal Render says:

    Great job on this. I’ve wondered about the scar since I moved here in 1990, and this was great.

  4. boomer49 says:

    Great story, good info.
    Sorry about the view of Cripple Creek from the Peak but the mining company met the Teller County Comissioners’ price and the County has given the green light to the continued destruction of the area…so it goes.

  5. Philip L. says:

    I appreciate the work that was put into reclaiming the land that was ‘scarred’ up by Castle Concrete. It just seems like a really good resource. Too good to just be locked away without access for anyone. I’d love to see it added as open space but left as somewhere not easily accessible, or developed, so that it isn’t overrun.

  6. Shannon G. says:

    Every morning on my way to work, by young boys and I see the scar. I’ve been watching it since moving here in 1994. It was such an eyesore at first, so sad looking. But during the last few years it’s been getting greener and looking better. Just the other day, we noticed the darker green “sticks” of the trees from the GoG road and were so excited that we could really see the trees. Thank you for sharing it’s story and now that we know the big horn sheep live there, we’re even more excepting of it’s future. Let it get and stay wild again.

  7. Wanda Reaves says:

    Thanks for your comments about the reclamation work. In response to Louise’s comments there have been several attempts to get the reclamation laws changed to include visual mitigation to no avail. There are many reasons not the least of which are the very powerful mining lobbyists at the state legislature. Colordo’s economic base since the state’s formation has been mining..mostly coal. Mining companies pay a severance tax which goes into the Energy Impact Assistance Program. Our Foundation asked and received a $75,000 grant from that program which had to be matched by local contributions. That got us started in 1995 with the actual planting, etc.
    Regarding the mess in the barn the barn does not belong to us. We have recycled much of our stuff. Since we stopped planting on Queens in 2002 the barn has been vandalized three times. We will be donating much of that material to Park and Rec.

  8. Caroline says:

    I’m one of Wanda’s daughters and I live in Austin, Texas. My mother has put her heart and soul into this and I am so proud of all that she has done to coordinate the reclamation work. Wonderful job Mom!!

  9. ele says:

    The Big Horn Sheep story is great. I had no idea.

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