While this 1950s vintage promotional film for Colorado Springs isn’t as wonderfully campy as Time To Live!, it’s ripe with exquisitely over-rendered ad copy that doesn’t fail to marvelously capture our bygone and “glamorous little city of 65,000″ as the narrator and his wife Blessing live the dream of the pioneers in style and luxury.

I mean, how can you deny a sentence like the following, which so fancifully manages to denigrate Lt. Zebulon Pike’s failed attempt to summit the peak that bears his name:

“How chagrined the good liutenant would have been could he have seen these triplets beside the summit marker.”

Indeed! And don’t fail to note the scores of young military gents passing through the doors of the Fine Arts Center or the “exquisite lagoon” behind the Broadmoor.

Thanks, again, go to the Pikes Peak Library District for putting these gems up on YouTube.

 

2 Responses to A Glamorous Little City of 65,000

  1. Julia Evans says:

    Ha! I bet The Broadmoor doesn’t use “exquisite lagoon” in their promos any time soon.

    I remember that freaky-crazy signal tower on the old summit house. It wasn’t much fun to be up there when the wind came up and the sleet started.

  2. Matthew Crawford says:

    Hey, cool building with a store named Kaufman’s. I wonder where that is? Oh wait, we citizens just subsidized it’s demolition!

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