With the ubiquity of digital photography and iPhone photography contests these days, it’s rare to see such an ambitious exhibition of analog black and white photography like “A Year in the Life of a Camera,” which opens tomorrow night at Heebee Jeebee’s gallery. As Heather Oelklaus, who came up with the idea when her photographer friend Grant Kennedy asked her to shoot some photos with his camera—explains in the audio-slideshow, the idea was to give 52 local photographers 1 week each over the course of a year to rediscover the the magic of shooting and developing black and white photographs manually. For some, the results changed their lives.

Full information, including times and directions, can be found HERE at PeakRadar.com.

 

6 Responses to One Year, One Camera, 52 Photographers

  1. Mary Ellen says:

    MESMERIZING!

  2. Kevin J. says:

    Excellent (again). Can’t wait to see this show! (And thanks for the linky-poo!)

  3. Mike Procell says:

    Very cool! I love B&W!(maybe because there is so little in this world that really is..)

  4. Lavonne Parks says:

    I knew about the pictures and the resulting book and I really enjoyed hearing how the project came about. Great interview and inspiring to others!

  5. S. McClow-Kinsey says:

    Great idea.the photos are fascinating.

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