In case you missed it the first time around, please enjoy this encore presentation of the very first Big Something we ever published to the KRCC website on May 21st of this year. It’s a guided audio tour of Pat Musick’s home in Garden of the Gods, which her father, the artist Archie Musick, built by hand into the rocks after World War II. More on that below.

(We recommend clicking on the arrows in the lower right hand of the slide show to view it full screen).

Few people outside the arts community remember the Colorado Springs-based artist Archie Musick. Musick arrived via freight train in 1924 and began to study at the Broadmoor Art Academy. He quickly became one of the region’s most inventive painters, blending landscape and surrealist visions with a minimal Japanese style. Shortly after World War II, Musick began building his dream home on what was then a wide-open space near Garden of the Gods. Sandwiched between two outcrops of Fountain sandstone, Musick incorporated the landscape into the very walls of the house.

Musick died in 1978, shortly before his major retrospective at the Fine arts Center. “He called it his ‘major reprehensive,’” said his daughter Pat Musick, an accomplished enamel artist, who now lives and makes art in the home Archie built. She invited us in for a guided-audio slideshow of this local architectural gem!

(Please leave a comment below or send us your thoughts, ideas and tips for future Big Somethings to thebigsomething@krcc.org.)

 

3 Responses to Big Something Encore: Pat Musick's Amazing Home in GOG

  1. Cari says:

    fabulous. the early vs. current photos are terrific and show how much things have changed, and i love the connection with other local institutions–FAC, Canon Elementary.

  2. Danna Tullis says:

    I loved this! The earth simplicity is inspiring.

  3. Neena says:

    Lovely. Thanks for sharing it.

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