The economic cloud that darkens all of our doorsteps looms long into the future for many in Colorado Springs right now. How will our city government weather this storm, or should it? Are the religious non-profit and military foundations of our current economy going to hinder efforts to attract innovative businesses, or should we keep putting our eggs in that basket and attract more? Has TABOR (the Tax Payer’s Bill of Rights) crippled the city, or will it force us to be more innovative in ways that don’t involve government. No matter the outcome, folks are talking.

A group of four anonymous individuals created a website where anyone can fill out a postcard with their ideas on how to make Colorado Springs “rock”. Watch the slideshow above to learn more about iColoradoSprings and go HERE to print out your own postcard or submit your ideas.

Go HERE to read John Hazlehurst’s recent column on the subject of our many efforts to re-brand ourselves over the years HERE.

Read my Dream City 2020 article on 10 things we can learn from other cities HERE.

And, by all means, please give us your thoughts and opinions on Colorado Springs’ future in the comments below. Thanks!

 

3 Responses to Back to the Future? A Big Something Forum

  1. Coming from Long Island a decade and a half ago, COS already rocks, and rocks heavily. If a city our size has an equal, I haven’t heard or seen of it.

    More folks should enjoy downtown though as many folks I know don’t go there often enough. It isn’t from a lack of anything specific, it’s from competition from the cocooning suburban culture that exists today. Maybe parking could be made easier.

  2. Noel Black says:

    I had a couple discussions with a few involved parties, including one from the iColoradoSprings group, about whether or not we’re just living under a perception problem, i.e. a hangover from the bad publicity received during the past decade over all the evangelical debacles like Amendment 2 and the Haggard scandal. I would say that’s a big part of it. Having also lived in many cities and a handful of other countries in my life, this IS a great place to live. Which isn’t to say we don’t have our problems as evidenced by the current City budget crisis. But it’s not like Austin, Portland, etc. are perfect places either.

  3. [...] [July 8, 2009] What could be more summer in Colorado than a tour through Garden of the Gods?…Back to the Future? A Big Something Forum [July 7, 2009] The economic cloud that darkens all of our doorsteps looms long into the future [...]

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