The economic cloud that darkens all of our doorsteps looms long into the future for many in Colorado Springs right now. How will our city government weather this storm, or should it? Are the religious non-profit and military foundations of our current economy going to hinder efforts to attract innovative businesses, or should we keep putting our eggs in that basket and attract more? Has TABOR (the Tax Payer’s Bill of Rights) crippled the city, or will it force us to be more innovative in ways that don’t involve government. No matter the outcome, folks are talking.

A group of four anonymous individuals created a website where anyone can fill out a postcard with their ideas on how to make Colorado Springs “rock”. Watch the slideshow above to learn more about iColoradoSprings and go HERE to print out your own postcard or submit your ideas.

Go HERE to read John Hazlehurst’s recent column on the subject of our many efforts to re-brand ourselves over the years HERE.

Read my Dream City 2020 article on 10 things we can learn from other cities HERE.

And, by all means, please give us your thoughts and opinions on Colorado Springs’ future in the comments below. Thanks!

 

3 Responses to Back to the Future? A Big Something Forum

  1. Coming from Long Island a decade and a half ago, COS already rocks, and rocks heavily. If a city our size has an equal, I haven’t heard or seen of it.

    More folks should enjoy downtown though as many folks I know don’t go there often enough. It isn’t from a lack of anything specific, it’s from competition from the cocooning suburban culture that exists today. Maybe parking could be made easier.

  2. Noel Black says:

    I had a couple discussions with a few involved parties, including one from the iColoradoSprings group, about whether or not we’re just living under a perception problem, i.e. a hangover from the bad publicity received during the past decade over all the evangelical debacles like Amendment 2 and the Haggard scandal. I would say that’s a big part of it. Having also lived in many cities and a handful of other countries in my life, this IS a great place to live. Which isn’t to say we don’t have our problems as evidenced by the current City budget crisis. But it’s not like Austin, Portland, etc. are perfect places either.

  3. […] [July 8, 2009] What could be more summer in Colorado than a tour through Garden of the Gods?…Back to the Future? A Big Something Forum [July 7, 2009] The economic cloud that darkens all of our doorsteps looms long into the future […]

News

July 4, 2015 | NPR · Greeks vote Sunday on a referendum that will determine the future of the country’s troubled economy and the question of whether Greece remains part of the eurozone.
 

AP
July 4, 2015 | NPR · With some 50,000 fireworks going off in just 25 minutes, Macy’s Fourth of July fireworks display in New York City is the biggest in the U.S. — but the task of putting it all together is even bigger.
 

Reuters/Landov
July 4, 2015 | NPR · The staff of hometown paper The Post and Courier feels the emotional toll of covering the church shootings and other traumatic events.
 

Arts & Life

Courtesy of Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollins
July 4, 2015 | NPR · As artificial intelligence alters human connection, Louisa Hall’s characters wrestle with whether machines can truly feel. Some “feel they have to stand up for a robot’s right to exist,” Hall says.
 

NPR
July 4, 2015 | NPR · Carolina de Robertis’ new novel God of Tango centers on a 17-year-old widow, recently arrived from Italy with little besides a violin. It’s Argentina, 1913 — and a magical new music fills the barrios.
 

July 4, 2015 | NPR · Elizabeth Wiley, chef-owner of two top Dayton, Ohio, restaurants, goes off-menu to cook beer-braised turkey thighs in her home kitchen.
 

Music

AP
July 4, 2015 | NPR · Tim Burton’s shadowy tales have taken us from a pastel suburban paradise to the dark streets of Gotham City. But what would Burton’s mysterious films be without Danny Elfman’s iconic music?
 

TNS /Landov
July 4, 2015 | NPR · The Grateful Dead play their final shows at Chicago’s Soldier Field this July 4 weekend. NPR’s Eric Westervelt reflects on how the Dead disrupted the musical and business norms of the industry.
 

Courtesy of the artist
July 4, 2015 | NPR · He’s from New York City; she’s from rural Tennessee. But the husband and wife, each known for backing up roots music’s biggest stars, make it work on their new album.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab