Pueblo’s Arkansas Levee mural is a great example of how something widely perceived as negative (grafitti, in this case) can be turned into a cultural opportunity. Once a long and large slab of concrete designed to channel runoff of the Arkansas River from the Pueblo Reservoir, the Levee became a natural site for grafitti artists, many of them rather clever students back in the 1980s. While the city could have fought it, covering it with abstract blobs of leftover paint, they embraced it, let a group organize it and, at 3-miles long and growing, allowed it to turn into the world’s longest continuous painting (according to the Guiness Book of World Records).

Please enjoy this slideshow which is NOT completely comprehensive, unfortunately (hey, it was 104 degrees out there), but covers most of the 3-miles beginning at the west end and heads East, including the south side of the Levee at the east end, which is mostly devoted to murals by children. We also recommend clicking the four arrows in the lower-right-hand corner of the slideshow to watch it in full-screen mode for the greatest appreciation of its details.

For more information on the mural project, you can go HERE.

We always appreciate your feedback and suggestions for other Big Somethings in the comments or by email at thebigsomething@krcc.org.

 

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