You don’t have to spit far these days to hit an urban garden. The trend, says the New York Times in THIS EXCELLENT ARTICLE about an Urban Farm in Milwaukee, has everything to do with the recession and the growing awareness of the impact that shipping food long-distance has on our climate and our pocketbooks. Of course, not all of us will be able to feed ourselves with what we grow in our back yards during the lean, mean growing season here in Southern Colorado. But there are ways around it, and John Sondericker has built an inexpensive Geo-Dome greenhouse in hopes of growing enough vegetables to supply his family of 5 for the better part of the year, if not year-round. We visited John and his dome for a brief tutorial on how he did it and how it’s going thus far.

For a more detailed description of how to build your own Geo-Dome Greenhouse, you can follow these links:

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

If you know of other urban garden stories we’d love to hear about them. Please leave comments or email us at thebigsomething@krcc.org. If you like this and other stories you’ve seen here, please sign up for our email list in the upper-right-hand corner of this page and encourage your friends to do so as well. You can also click on the “Share This” link below. Thanks! It helps KRCC grow.

 

7 Responses to A Do-It-Yourself Geo-Dome Greenhouse

  1. Joyce Cheney says:

    Here’s a much easier way to make a “quonset hut” greenhouse:
    Buy the longest lathing strips they sell at Home Depot/Lowes (lathing strips are wooden strips about 1/4″ x 1. 1.4″ inches and up to 16 ft, and are/were the skeletons holding up interior plaster walls). Make a straight line of sticks about 2 ft apart, Jamming one end of each stick into the ground. Arch each stick and jam the other end into the ground, making an arched “tunnel of strips. But sheet plastic big enough to cover the tunnel top. Think about wind direction when you orient your tunnel. If you find it’s necessary, cut some wind holes in the plastic. If you want your hut warmer, put moveable plastic flaps over the ends. If you anticipate flying bugs being a problem, buy netting at a fabric store and put moveable netting flaps over the ends. Experiment with how hot it gets it inside. If you want all of the plastic tunnel roof on all the time, staple all of the plastic to the strips (put a scrap of cloth on the outside of the plastic at each staple, to keep the plastic from ripping). If you want to fold all or part of the plastic roof back during the day, figure out a way to do that: lash it down with rope/baling twine etc that you can lash/unlash.or experiment with clothespins (they still sell wooden ones at KMart). I slept in one of these for an entire winter, and it routinely got hot inside (our plastic roof was not moveable).

  2. Eric Whitney says:

    Dude, don’t make me listen to you chew food on the radio. Gross….

  3. When it is that crisp and fresh it isn’t gross, it is beautiful.

  4. Julie Evans says:

    I’m really interesting in trying this out, but I don’t have a sheet-metal shop to punch out the connectors for me. Any ideas where I could get them? Or other cheap, easily attainable solutions?

  5. Marina Eckler says:

    I think there’s a kit version of this greenhouse available online?

  6. […] summer, we took you on a tour of a Buckminster Fuller-style geo-dome greenhouse made on the cheap by John Sondericker in his back yar…. We went back this summer to see how it went last summer and what modifications had to be made and […]

  7. Rick says:

    Here is the link to the 2nd year experience with the dome.

    http://radiocoloradocollege.org/2010/08/diy-geo-dome-greenhouse-year-2/

News

NPR
June 28, 2016 | NPR · A public health campaign to sell Africans on the virtues of orange-fleshed sweet potatoes — bred for higher Vitamin A levels — has helped combat malnutrition on the continent.
 

Mario Tama/Getty Images
June 28, 2016 | NPR · Scientists are making impressive progress in creating a vaccine for Zika. And they’re using a new technology that makes vaccine development faster than ever.
 

Getty Images
June 28, 2016 | NPR · The NPR Politics team looks at Donald Trump’s claims about globalization and trade.
 

Arts & Life

June 28, 2016 | NPR · It seems everyone has one: the eccentric relative much gossiped about. For Walter Shapiro, it’s his great-uncle, Freeman Bernstein. The vaudeville manager, boxing promoter, card shark and stock swindler managed to scam the Third Reich. Shapiro writes about this in his new book, Hustling Hitler.
 

June 28, 2016 | NPR · NPR’s Ari Shapiro talks with Stuart Stevens, a former strategist for Mitt Romney, whose new novel, The Innocent Have Nothing to Fear, tells the story of a neck-and-neck Republican primary campaign that ends up at a brokered convention.
 

June 28, 2016 | FA · Herr’s 1977 book, Dispatches, was based on his time covering the Vietnam War. He also contributed to the films Apocalypse Now and Full Metal Jacket. Herr died last week. Originally broadcast in 1990.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
June 28, 2016 | NPR · Banning Eyre reviews two albums from artists who are reinventing classic sounds from Puerto Rico: iLe’s iLevitable and Miramar’s Dedication to Sylvia Rexach.
 

Folk Alley
June 28, 2016 | FolkAlley · Hear the rising young Appalachian singer-songwriter perform live from the Adirondack Mountains.
 

NPR
June 28, 2016 | NPR · In performance together, the venerated saxophonist and the ubiquitous pianist perform three tunes that draw from their past while still looking to the future.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab