You don’t have to spit far these days to hit an urban garden. The trend, says the New York Times in THIS EXCELLENT ARTICLE about an Urban Farm in Milwaukee, has everything to do with the recession and the growing awareness of the impact that shipping food long-distance has on our climate and our pocketbooks. Of course, not all of us will be able to feed ourselves with what we grow in our back yards during the lean, mean growing season here in Southern Colorado. But there are ways around it, and John Sondericker has built an inexpensive Geo-Dome greenhouse in hopes of growing enough vegetables to supply his family of 5 for the better part of the year, if not year-round. We visited John and his dome for a brief tutorial on how he did it and how it’s going thus far.

For a more detailed description of how to build your own Geo-Dome Greenhouse, you can follow these links:

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

If you know of other urban garden stories we’d love to hear about them. Please leave comments or email us at thebigsomething@krcc.org. If you like this and other stories you’ve seen here, please sign up for our email list in the upper-right-hand corner of this page and encourage your friends to do so as well. You can also click on the “Share This” link below. Thanks! It helps KRCC grow.

 

7 Responses to A Do-It-Yourself Geo-Dome Greenhouse

  1. Joyce Cheney says:

    Here’s a much easier way to make a “quonset hut” greenhouse:
    Buy the longest lathing strips they sell at Home Depot/Lowes (lathing strips are wooden strips about 1/4″ x 1. 1.4″ inches and up to 16 ft, and are/were the skeletons holding up interior plaster walls). Make a straight line of sticks about 2 ft apart, Jamming one end of each stick into the ground. Arch each stick and jam the other end into the ground, making an arched “tunnel of strips. But sheet plastic big enough to cover the tunnel top. Think about wind direction when you orient your tunnel. If you find it’s necessary, cut some wind holes in the plastic. If you want your hut warmer, put moveable plastic flaps over the ends. If you anticipate flying bugs being a problem, buy netting at a fabric store and put moveable netting flaps over the ends. Experiment with how hot it gets it inside. If you want all of the plastic tunnel roof on all the time, staple all of the plastic to the strips (put a scrap of cloth on the outside of the plastic at each staple, to keep the plastic from ripping). If you want to fold all or part of the plastic roof back during the day, figure out a way to do that: lash it down with rope/baling twine etc that you can lash/unlash.or experiment with clothespins (they still sell wooden ones at KMart). I slept in one of these for an entire winter, and it routinely got hot inside (our plastic roof was not moveable).

  2. Eric Whitney says:

    Dude, don’t make me listen to you chew food on the radio. Gross….

  3. When it is that crisp and fresh it isn’t gross, it is beautiful.

  4. Julie Evans says:

    I’m really interesting in trying this out, but I don’t have a sheet-metal shop to punch out the connectors for me. Any ideas where I could get them? Or other cheap, easily attainable solutions?

  5. Marina Eckler says:

    I think there’s a kit version of this greenhouse available online?

  6. […] summer, we took you on a tour of a Buckminster Fuller-style geo-dome greenhouse made on the cheap by John Sondericker in his back yar…. We went back this summer to see how it went last summer and what modifications had to be made and […]

  7. Rick says:

    Here is the link to the 2nd year experience with the dome.

    http://radiocoloradocollege.org/2010/08/diy-geo-dome-greenhouse-year-2/

News

NPR
February 25, 2017 | NPR · The Democratic National Committee is picking a new chairman Saturday in Atlanta. We are following all the action and will update below.
 

February 25, 2017 | NPR · The blasts Saturday left at least 32 people dead in Homs. The attacks in the city held by President Bashar Assad’s regime are the latest violation of a tenuous peace brokered by Russia and Turkey.
 

AP
February 25, 2017 | NPR · People were dropping dead in Malaysia, and no one could figure out why their brains were swelling. A young scientist solved the mystery. Then he had to get people to believe him.
 

Arts & Life

Getty Images
February 25, 2017 | NPR · The Godfather was released 45 years ago this spring. NPR’s Scott Simon takes the anniversary as an opportunity to revisit some of his favorite lines from the classic film.
 

NPR
February 25, 2017 | NPR · Yiyun Li’s first book of nonfiction is an unusual memoir — one that examines her depression and suicidal thoughts by drifting through her memories and thoughts on literature.
 

Penguin Random House
February 25, 2017 | NPR · Sold in supermarkets for just 25 cents, these inexpensive picture books — with cheerful illustrations and golden spines — were designed to democratize the children’s book market.
 

Music

Courtesy of the artist
February 25, 2017 | NPR · Filmmaker Bruce Spiegel speaks with Weekend Edition about the eight-year process behind Bill Evans: Time Remembered.
 

February 25, 2017 | NPR · His grandfather is author Larry McMurtry, his father is songwriter James McMurtry. So it’s no surprise Curtis McMurtry’s songs are full of vivid characters. His new album is The Hornet’s Nest.
 

A24
February 25, 2017 | NPR · The Academy has a history of baffling picks for Best Score — but this year’s nominees are so daring and startling that it’s hard to go wrong.
 

Get the KRCC iPhone App

The Writer's Almanac

Radiolab