Jeff Mapes, a Portland, OR-based journalist, has just published an incredibly useful look at the the political realities of cycling as transportation. Citing lessons learned from Amsterdam, Davis, CA, New York City, Portland and other communities, Mapes argues that something as as simple as adding a well-connected network of bike lanes (a few thousand gallons of paint!) can transform an entire community, increase safety for all, attract a creative work force, reduce emissions, increase community health and well-being, and save everyone a lot of money. Sound to good to be true?

Listen to this half-an-hour interview we did with Mapes and find out why helmets don’t necessarily equal safety and how cycling could save our community $1 billion every year.

Jeff Mapes Interview

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One Response to Bike Month: The Politics of Cycling

  1. Al says:

    Wow! I’ve attended 6 League of American Bicyclists, National Bicycle Summits and I have to say that this one half hour interview with Jeff Maples got to the heart of the fundamental issues addressed in the three day conferences. The interviewer cuts to the chase, asked outstanding questions and got Jeff to answer them directly. If only our local news could be so effective in getting responses from our city council and Colorado Springs Utilities spokespersons, Colorado Springs residents would not be clueless about our city’s fundamental city’s.
    Well done. This was my first use of The Big Something and you have exceeded my expectrations.

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