78 photographs of iris is probably overly indulgent, but we couldn’t help it: they were myriad and many-colored and so, so …. sigh.

Why doesn’t Colorado Springs have an iris festival? They couldn’t be easier to grow in the Colorado Springs climate and to share with your friends and neighbors. In fact, HERE are some excellent instructions on how to divide your iris whether you want to give them as gifts or simply add abundance to your own yard.

Anyway, what better way to start off the week than with a garden tour set to music? (If you don’t want to hear the music and just want to look a the images, just click pause and advance the images with the arrows).

Thanks to all who submitted photographs!

dudley_-_09_-_the_flower_that_eats_the_moon

By the way, if you liked the music that went along with the slideshow, you can download it for FREE at the FreeMusicArchive.org! It’s called “The Flower that Eats the Moon” by Dudley and all you have to do is click HERE and then click on the downward pointing arrow. Thanks, Dudley!

To read our post about the many wonders of the FreeMusicArchive.org click

 

5 Responses to An Embarrassment of Iris

  1. Colorado Springs does have an Iris Society – the Elmohr Iris Society if I remember correctly, named after a botanist who developed iris hybrids in the Springs. There is an iris sale by the society each year, and they have a demonstration garden up north where they grow many varieties developed in the area.

  2. Liz Arnold says:

    I loved that!!! I love the irises in Colorado Springs, and if you take the time to stop and smell them, they are so fragrant and seem to smell like they look – the purple ones smell like grape, the yellow ones have a creamy lemon smell. Thanks for sharing!

  3. Mike Procell says:

    Wow! These “bearded ladies” are much prettier than the ones at the circus..

  4. Delaney says:

    We have lavender ones at the station that smell just like grape Kool-aid.

  5. P.S. Bearded iris, also known as “Poor Man’s Orchid.” Yes, grape smell. Mmmmmmmmm.

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